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GIS, Ethnography, and Cultural Research: Putting Maps Back into Ethnographic Mapping

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This article discusses how geographic information system (GIS)

    technologies were used to enhance ethnographic methodologies

    within a cultural research project, Creative Tropical City: Mapping

    Darwin’s Creative Industries. It shows how mapping technologies

    can broaden the scope of data available via interview practices

    and produce innovative ways of communicating research results to

    stakeholder communities. A key component of the interview process

    was a “mental mapping” exercise whereby interviewees drew

    sketches, revealing important sites and linkages between people

    and places. A GIS linked responses to real-world locations, collating

    and displaying them in meaningful ways. Responses uncovered

    Darwin’s unique geography of creative inspiration—a geography

    that preferences Darwin’s natural environment over sites of urban

    creative milieu.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Brennan-Horley, C. R., Luckman, S., Gibson, C. R. & Willoughby-Smith, J. (2010). GIS, Ethnography, and Cultural Research: Putting Maps Back into Ethnographic Mapping. The Information Society, 26 (2), 92-103.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77049116324

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5042

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 92

End Page


  • 103

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • This article discusses how geographic information system (GIS)

    technologies were used to enhance ethnographic methodologies

    within a cultural research project, Creative Tropical City: Mapping

    Darwin’s Creative Industries. It shows how mapping technologies

    can broaden the scope of data available via interview practices

    and produce innovative ways of communicating research results to

    stakeholder communities. A key component of the interview process

    was a “mental mapping” exercise whereby interviewees drew

    sketches, revealing important sites and linkages between people

    and places. A GIS linked responses to real-world locations, collating

    and displaying them in meaningful ways. Responses uncovered

    Darwin’s unique geography of creative inspiration—a geography

    that preferences Darwin’s natural environment over sites of urban

    creative milieu.

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Brennan-Horley, C. R., Luckman, S., Gibson, C. R. & Willoughby-Smith, J. (2010). GIS, Ethnography, and Cultural Research: Putting Maps Back into Ethnographic Mapping. The Information Society, 26 (2), 92-103.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77049116324

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/5042

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 92

End Page


  • 103

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 2