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Vegetation structure influences the vertical stratification of open- and edge-space aerial-foraging bats in harvested forests

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Heavy logging leads to regrowth of dense forest. which may adversely affect the flight and foraging activities of bats. We compared Insectivorous bat activity and insect abundance at three heights (understorey, subcanopy and canopy), two locations (forest and track) and three time periods (evening, night and dawn), in old and Young regrowth sites in south-eastern Australia (456 detector-hours). We measured activity levels of all bats and four echolocation guilds-one open-space and three edge-space aerial-foraging guilds. Mean bat activity in the subcanopy and canopy was up to 11 times that in the understorey of forests, a pattern opposite to that of insect abundance. However, bat activity in the two upper strata was lower in young regrowth than in old regrowth Vegetation was more cluttered in young regrowth at these upper heights (closer stems and less vertical space in the subcanopy). Mean activity on the track was 2-5 times higher than in the forest, particularly at understorey level (17 times higher for all bats). where vegetation was less cluttered (more distant understorey trees and shrubs, and less cover of ground vegetation). Time of night had little effect on bat activity. The negative response of bat guilds to increased clutter was strongest in the open-space guild and weakest in the edge-space guild with the highest frequency calls. There was an interaction between insect abundance and an index of vegetation openness, with high values of both variables producing high bat activity levels for all bats and the two highest frequency call guilds Our results highlight the need for management practices in logged forests that increase or preserve the amount of flight and foraging space available to bats. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

UOW Authors


  •   Adams, Maria D. (external author)
  •   Law, Bradley S. (external author)
  •   French, Kris O.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Adams, M., Law, B. S. & French, K. O. (2009). Vegetation structure influences the vertical stratification of open- and edge-space aerial-foraging bats in harvested forests. Forest Ecology and Management, 258 (9), 2090-2100.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70349111040

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4977

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 2090

End Page


  • 2100

Volume


  • 258

Issue


  • 9

Abstract


  • Heavy logging leads to regrowth of dense forest. which may adversely affect the flight and foraging activities of bats. We compared Insectivorous bat activity and insect abundance at three heights (understorey, subcanopy and canopy), two locations (forest and track) and three time periods (evening, night and dawn), in old and Young regrowth sites in south-eastern Australia (456 detector-hours). We measured activity levels of all bats and four echolocation guilds-one open-space and three edge-space aerial-foraging guilds. Mean bat activity in the subcanopy and canopy was up to 11 times that in the understorey of forests, a pattern opposite to that of insect abundance. However, bat activity in the two upper strata was lower in young regrowth than in old regrowth Vegetation was more cluttered in young regrowth at these upper heights (closer stems and less vertical space in the subcanopy). Mean activity on the track was 2-5 times higher than in the forest, particularly at understorey level (17 times higher for all bats). where vegetation was less cluttered (more distant understorey trees and shrubs, and less cover of ground vegetation). Time of night had little effect on bat activity. The negative response of bat guilds to increased clutter was strongest in the open-space guild and weakest in the edge-space guild with the highest frequency calls. There was an interaction between insect abundance and an index of vegetation openness, with high values of both variables producing high bat activity levels for all bats and the two highest frequency call guilds Our results highlight the need for management practices in logged forests that increase or preserve the amount of flight and foraging space available to bats. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

UOW Authors


  •   Adams, Maria D. (external author)
  •   Law, Bradley S. (external author)
  •   French, Kris O.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Adams, M., Law, B. S. & French, K. O. (2009). Vegetation structure influences the vertical stratification of open- and edge-space aerial-foraging bats in harvested forests. Forest Ecology and Management, 258 (9), 2090-2100.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70349111040

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/4977

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 10

Start Page


  • 2090

End Page


  • 2100

Volume


  • 258

Issue


  • 9