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Training inpatient mental health staff how to enhance patient engagement with medications: Medication Alliance training and dissemination outcomes in a large US mental health hospital

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Rationale, aims and objectives: The Medication Alliance training program has previously been shown to be effective in enhancing clinician knowledge, attitudes and skills in regard to non-adherent individuals in a community based psychiatric setting. The current study attempts to replicate these findings in an inpatient setting and assess the feasibility of dissemination using a train-the-trainer model.

    Method: One hundred and thirteen staff from four wards at an inpatient psychiatric facility attended Medication Alliance training workshops over three days. Two wards comprised an expert trained group (n = 67); and the remaining two wards made up a novice trained group (n = 46). The novice trained group attended training six months after the expert group, and were trained by selected trainees from the expert group. Participants completed a package of questionnaires both before and after their training to determine if Medication Alliance resulted in any changes in knowledge, attitudes and skills.

    Results: Paired t-tests showed significant improvements across both groups for knowledge, attitudes and one skill domain following training in Medication Alliance. There were no differences at baseline between groups and analysis of post test scores yielded no significant difference between the groups in terms of training effect for knowledge, attitudes or skills.

    Conclusions: Medication Alliance can be successfully implemented in an inpatient setting, enhancing knowledge, attitudes, and at least some skill domains of staff in dealing with non-adherent patients. The equivalence of results between the expert and novice trained training groups suggests that Medication Alliance may be more broadly disseminated using a cost effective train-the-trainer model.

UOW Authors


  •   Byrne, Mitch K.
  •   Willis, Aimee (external author)
  •   Deane, Frank
  •   Hawkins, Barbara (external author)
  •   Quinn, Rebecca (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Byrne, M. K., Willis, A., Deane, F. P., Hawkins, B. & Quinn, R. (2010). Training inpatient mental health staff how to enhance patient engagement with medications: Medication Alliance training and dissemination outcomes in a large US mental health hospital. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 16 (1), 114-120.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77149170041

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3386

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 114

End Page


  • 120

Volume


  • 16

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Rationale, aims and objectives: The Medication Alliance training program has previously been shown to be effective in enhancing clinician knowledge, attitudes and skills in regard to non-adherent individuals in a community based psychiatric setting. The current study attempts to replicate these findings in an inpatient setting and assess the feasibility of dissemination using a train-the-trainer model.

    Method: One hundred and thirteen staff from four wards at an inpatient psychiatric facility attended Medication Alliance training workshops over three days. Two wards comprised an expert trained group (n = 67); and the remaining two wards made up a novice trained group (n = 46). The novice trained group attended training six months after the expert group, and were trained by selected trainees from the expert group. Participants completed a package of questionnaires both before and after their training to determine if Medication Alliance resulted in any changes in knowledge, attitudes and skills.

    Results: Paired t-tests showed significant improvements across both groups for knowledge, attitudes and one skill domain following training in Medication Alliance. There were no differences at baseline between groups and analysis of post test scores yielded no significant difference between the groups in terms of training effect for knowledge, attitudes or skills.

    Conclusions: Medication Alliance can be successfully implemented in an inpatient setting, enhancing knowledge, attitudes, and at least some skill domains of staff in dealing with non-adherent patients. The equivalence of results between the expert and novice trained training groups suggests that Medication Alliance may be more broadly disseminated using a cost effective train-the-trainer model.

UOW Authors


  •   Byrne, Mitch K.
  •   Willis, Aimee (external author)
  •   Deane, Frank
  •   Hawkins, Barbara (external author)
  •   Quinn, Rebecca (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2010

Citation


  • Byrne, M. K., Willis, A., Deane, F. P., Hawkins, B. & Quinn, R. (2010). Training inpatient mental health staff how to enhance patient engagement with medications: Medication Alliance training and dissemination outcomes in a large US mental health hospital. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 16 (1), 114-120.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-77149170041

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3386

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 114

End Page


  • 120

Volume


  • 16

Issue


  • 1