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The effects of different regulation systems on television food advertising to children

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Objective: The aim of this study was to model children’s potential exposure to television food advertisements under different regulatory scenarios to demonstrate the policy implications of regulatory change in Australia.

    Methods: Television advertising data was collected from Sydney commercial television channels from 14-20 May 2006. Extrapolating from these data, the patterns of food advertising under four regulatory

    scenarios were examined, including arrangements restricting the content, volume and timing of advertisements.

    Results: Each scenario resulted in a reduction of total and non-core food advertisements. The scenario to restrict non-core food advertisements during the major viewing period (7:00-20:30) led to the largest reduction in total and non-core food advertisements (79.2% reduction), with no change in the frequency of core food advertisements.

    Conclusions: The results illustrate the potential for reducing children’s exposure to food advertising through simple regulatory restrictions.

    Implications: This research contributes to future debates on the regulation of television food advertising. It is particularly relevant as Australian regulations will be under review in 2007.

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • Kelly, B. P., King, L., Bauman, A., Smith, B. J. & Flood, V. M. (2007). The effects of different regulation systems on television food advertising to children. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 (4), 340-343.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-34548078669

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1340&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/329

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 340

End Page


  • 343

Volume


  • 31

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Objective: The aim of this study was to model children’s potential exposure to television food advertisements under different regulatory scenarios to demonstrate the policy implications of regulatory change in Australia.

    Methods: Television advertising data was collected from Sydney commercial television channels from 14-20 May 2006. Extrapolating from these data, the patterns of food advertising under four regulatory

    scenarios were examined, including arrangements restricting the content, volume and timing of advertisements.

    Results: Each scenario resulted in a reduction of total and non-core food advertisements. The scenario to restrict non-core food advertisements during the major viewing period (7:00-20:30) led to the largest reduction in total and non-core food advertisements (79.2% reduction), with no change in the frequency of core food advertisements.

    Conclusions: The results illustrate the potential for reducing children’s exposure to food advertising through simple regulatory restrictions.

    Implications: This research contributes to future debates on the regulation of television food advertising. It is particularly relevant as Australian regulations will be under review in 2007.

Authors


Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • Kelly, B. P., King, L., Bauman, A., Smith, B. J. & Flood, V. M. (2007). The effects of different regulation systems on television food advertising to children. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 31 (4), 340-343.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-34548078669

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1340&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/329

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 340

End Page


  • 343

Volume


  • 31

Issue


  • 4