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Emergence, change and precarious systems: A new lens on people and organisation

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The modern world is characterised by complexity and uncertainty, within an environment of evolutionary and

    revolutionary change. New holistic, multifaceted and innovative research is needed to enhance how we

    understand the way people organize in this environment. Recent research has moved away from strategies

    seeking mere efficiencies in the production of goods and services, towards strategies that encourage creativity

    and innovation and are socially and ethically acceptable.

    These newer strategies are socially innovative. That is, they develop concepts and tools to enable individuals

    and communities to organise in a way which promotes both material standard of living and personal well-being.

    Necessarily, understanding people and organisation – that is, the phenomenon of organisation itself and its

    human dimension, not simply various different organisations – is crucial to this endeavour. It means

    understanding change, both planned and emergent, and coming to terms with the precarious nature of many

    systems which support the way people organise in a changing environment. Using the research being

    undertaken by members of the ‘people and organisation’ research node of SInet, the paper reflects on the

    matrix of issues that arise from considering, on the one hand, ‘people’ and ‘organization’ and, on the other,

    ‘change’, ‘emergence’ and ‘precariousness’. While the projects are diverse, they are linked through their

    commitment to investigating people and organization through an SI lens.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Barrett, M., Dawson, P., Hasan, H. M. & Zanko, M. (2009). Emergence, change and precarious systems: A new lens on people and organisation. Social Innovation Network Conference (pp. 8-9). Wollongong, Australia: University of Wollongong.

Start Page


  • 8

End Page


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@sinet/documents/doc/uow070412.pdf

Abstract


  • The modern world is characterised by complexity and uncertainty, within an environment of evolutionary and

    revolutionary change. New holistic, multifaceted and innovative research is needed to enhance how we

    understand the way people organize in this environment. Recent research has moved away from strategies

    seeking mere efficiencies in the production of goods and services, towards strategies that encourage creativity

    and innovation and are socially and ethically acceptable.

    These newer strategies are socially innovative. That is, they develop concepts and tools to enable individuals

    and communities to organise in a way which promotes both material standard of living and personal well-being.

    Necessarily, understanding people and organisation – that is, the phenomenon of organisation itself and its

    human dimension, not simply various different organisations – is crucial to this endeavour. It means

    understanding change, both planned and emergent, and coming to terms with the precarious nature of many

    systems which support the way people organise in a changing environment. Using the research being

    undertaken by members of the ‘people and organisation’ research node of SInet, the paper reflects on the

    matrix of issues that arise from considering, on the one hand, ‘people’ and ‘organization’ and, on the other,

    ‘change’, ‘emergence’ and ‘precariousness’. While the projects are diverse, they are linked through their

    commitment to investigating people and organization through an SI lens.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Barrett, M., Dawson, P., Hasan, H. M. & Zanko, M. (2009). Emergence, change and precarious systems: A new lens on people and organisation. Social Innovation Network Conference (pp. 8-9). Wollongong, Australia: University of Wollongong.

Start Page


  • 8

End Page


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@sinet/documents/doc/uow070412.pdf