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Applied systems research in social innovation: a position statement

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • In their forthcoming article Dawson and Daniel (2009) provide a useful working definition of social innovation,

    referring to it as “…the process of collective idea generation, selection and implementation by people who

    participate collaboratively to meet social challenges. These ideas are owned by people who work together in

    pursuing social goals that may- but need not- service other organisational, technical, commercial or scientific

    goals.” Defined in this way the term has, potentially, very wide boundaries- from new forms of organization and

    new concepts of ‘family’, to new ways of using information and communication technologies, and from new

    ideas of community to new products or services. This paper is a first approximation to identify relevant theory

    and develop a suitable framework that would allow applied systems researchers- those whose focus is usually

    operational and systems-orientated- to come to an understand about how their practices and technical

    innovations can lead to social innovation in broader organisational and societal senses. Combining ideas from

    the socio-technical movement, systems thinking, and semiotic theory, this first approximation to a social

    innovation framework recognises that an organisationally relevant view of social innovation needs to be local

    first, incremental rather than grand slam, must necessarily utilise evolutionary design principles, requires the

    promotion of participation in order to achieve stakeholder buy-in, as well as requiring a continuous improvement

    and innovation-oriented culture to be fostered within the organisation. Elements of this framework utilise action

    research methodology, abductive thinking, contextual features and communicative dimensions, both discursive

    and linguistic.

Authors


  •   Clarke, Rodney J.
  •   Spedding, Trevor A. (external author)
  •   Dawson, Patrick M.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Clarke, R., Spedding, T. & Dawson, P. (2009). Applied systems research in social innovation: a position statement. Social Innovation Network Conference (pp. 12-13). Wollongong, Australia: University of Wollongong.

Start Page


  • 12

End Page


  • 13

Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong, Australia

Abstract


  • In their forthcoming article Dawson and Daniel (2009) provide a useful working definition of social innovation,

    referring to it as “…the process of collective idea generation, selection and implementation by people who

    participate collaboratively to meet social challenges. These ideas are owned by people who work together in

    pursuing social goals that may- but need not- service other organisational, technical, commercial or scientific

    goals.” Defined in this way the term has, potentially, very wide boundaries- from new forms of organization and

    new concepts of ‘family’, to new ways of using information and communication technologies, and from new

    ideas of community to new products or services. This paper is a first approximation to identify relevant theory

    and develop a suitable framework that would allow applied systems researchers- those whose focus is usually

    operational and systems-orientated- to come to an understand about how their practices and technical

    innovations can lead to social innovation in broader organisational and societal senses. Combining ideas from

    the socio-technical movement, systems thinking, and semiotic theory, this first approximation to a social

    innovation framework recognises that an organisationally relevant view of social innovation needs to be local

    first, incremental rather than grand slam, must necessarily utilise evolutionary design principles, requires the

    promotion of participation in order to achieve stakeholder buy-in, as well as requiring a continuous improvement

    and innovation-oriented culture to be fostered within the organisation. Elements of this framework utilise action

    research methodology, abductive thinking, contextual features and communicative dimensions, both discursive

    and linguistic.

Authors


  •   Clarke, Rodney J.
  •   Spedding, Trevor A. (external author)
  •   Dawson, Patrick M.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Clarke, R., Spedding, T. & Dawson, P. (2009). Applied systems research in social innovation: a position statement. Social Innovation Network Conference (pp. 12-13). Wollongong, Australia: University of Wollongong.

Start Page


  • 12

End Page


  • 13

Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong, Australia