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A qualitative study of the Australian midwives' approaches to Listeria education as a food-related risk during pregnancy

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Objective

    to explore midwives’ perceptions of food-related risks and their approaches to Listeria education during pregnancy.

    Design

    an exploratory design within a qualitative framework.

    Setting

    one private and two public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    Participants

    10 midwives providing antenatal care in the selected hospitals.

    Findings

    midwives had a range of approaches, from active to passive, to Listeria education. The main education provided was focused only on some of the high Listeria-risk foods with little education on safe food-handling practices. Midwives’ perception of food-related risks was a function of their limited scientific knowledge and their reliance on their experiential knowledge and their common sense. System constraints such as temporal pressure, limited availability of educational materials and low adherence to Listeria recommendations within the health system were also identified to influence midwives’ practice.

    Key Conclusions

    professional practice guidelines regarding food safety and Listeria education are needed, together with relevant professional training and review of hospital practices in relation to this important health issue.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Bondarianzadeh, D., Yeatman, H. & Condon-Paoloni, D. (2011). A qualitative study of the Australian midwives' approaches to Listeria education as a food-related risk during pregnancy. Midwifery, 27 (2), 221-228.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79953165431

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2043&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/994

Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 221

End Page


  • 228

Volume


  • 27

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6WN9-4X8YMMK-3-1&_cdi=6957&_user=202616&_pii=S0266613809000758&_origin=browse&_coverDate=04%2F30%2F2011&_sk=999729997&view=c&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkzk&md5=c0bb33cf5b02320ec8b18053b20d4cf7&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

Abstract


  • Objective

    to explore midwives’ perceptions of food-related risks and their approaches to Listeria education during pregnancy.

    Design

    an exploratory design within a qualitative framework.

    Setting

    one private and two public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia.

    Participants

    10 midwives providing antenatal care in the selected hospitals.

    Findings

    midwives had a range of approaches, from active to passive, to Listeria education. The main education provided was focused only on some of the high Listeria-risk foods with little education on safe food-handling practices. Midwives’ perception of food-related risks was a function of their limited scientific knowledge and their reliance on their experiential knowledge and their common sense. System constraints such as temporal pressure, limited availability of educational materials and low adherence to Listeria recommendations within the health system were also identified to influence midwives’ practice.

    Key Conclusions

    professional practice guidelines regarding food safety and Listeria education are needed, together with relevant professional training and review of hospital practices in relation to this important health issue.

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Bondarianzadeh, D., Yeatman, H. & Condon-Paoloni, D. (2011). A qualitative study of the Australian midwives' approaches to Listeria education as a food-related risk during pregnancy. Midwifery, 27 (2), 221-228.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-79953165431

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2043&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/994

Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 221

End Page


  • 228

Volume


  • 27

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6WN9-4X8YMMK-3-1&_cdi=6957&_user=202616&_pii=S0266613809000758&_origin=browse&_coverDate=04%2F30%2F2011&_sk=999729997&view=c&wchp=dGLzVzz-zSkzk&md5=c0bb33cf5b02320ec8b18053b20d4cf7&ie=/sdarticle.pdf