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Visual factors affecting glideslope control and touchdown during simulated aircraft landing

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • This flight simulation study examined the effects of starting height, scene lighting, and runway length on

    glideslope control and landing quality. Aircraft landings were simulated under day or night conditions, with pilots starting either too high, too low or on an ideal 3 degree glideslope. Student and private pilot participants actively controlled simulated landings until they touched down on either a long or a short runway. Both student and private pilots were poor at perceiving and compensating for approaches that started too high or too low, particularly during night conditions. Pilots were also poor at converging with an ideal glideslope, and tended to maintain the angle at which they started the final approach. Final landing quality was not substantially compromised by earlier errors during the glideslope control phase. Pilots appeared to be adjusting for glideslope errors through their performance of the landing flare, in which private pilots were significantly more accurate.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Ash, A., Palmisano, S. A. & Kim, J. (2009). Visual factors affecting glideslope control and touchdown during simulated aircraft landing. Combined abstracts of 2009 Australian psychology conferences : The abstracts of the 44th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society (p. 62). Melbourne: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 62

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne

Abstract


  • This flight simulation study examined the effects of starting height, scene lighting, and runway length on

    glideslope control and landing quality. Aircraft landings were simulated under day or night conditions, with pilots starting either too high, too low or on an ideal 3 degree glideslope. Student and private pilot participants actively controlled simulated landings until they touched down on either a long or a short runway. Both student and private pilots were poor at perceiving and compensating for approaches that started too high or too low, particularly during night conditions. Pilots were also poor at converging with an ideal glideslope, and tended to maintain the angle at which they started the final approach. Final landing quality was not substantially compromised by earlier errors during the glideslope control phase. Pilots appeared to be adjusting for glideslope errors through their performance of the landing flare, in which private pilots were significantly more accurate.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Ash, A., Palmisano, S. A. & Kim, J. (2009). Visual factors affecting glideslope control and touchdown during simulated aircraft landing. Combined abstracts of 2009 Australian psychology conferences : The abstracts of the 44th Annual Conference of the Australian Psychological Society (p. 62). Melbourne: Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 62

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne