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Factors effecting the perception of ground slant during simulated aircraft landing

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The present study examined whether the visual perception of geographical ground slant was accurate

    during simulated aircraft landings when the simulated ground slant, glideslope and aircraft pitch are

    varied. Sixteen participants viewed brief motion sequences simulating aircraft landing approaches

    towards a runway. After 4s the motion ceased and they then had to adjust the geographical slant of the

    runway so it appeared horizontal (by rotating the ground plane around the simulated aimpoint using a

    joystick). Results indicated that perceived ground slant not only varied with the simulated ground slant,

    but also with changes to the simulated glideslope. Large simulated ground slants (over 6 deg) were

    overestimated, while small simulated ground slants (under 6 deg) were underestimated. As the glideslope increased, ground slant overestimation also increased. Perceived ground slant was found to be robust to changes in simulated aircraft pitch. Based on these results, it seems likely that pilot misperceptions of glideslope may be due in some part to misperceptions of geographical ground slant. These results also have important implications for pilots landing on upsloping or downsloping runways, as they will be more likely to overshoot or land short of their desired touchdown point.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Murray, R. & Palmisano, S. A. (2009). Factors effecting the perception of ground slant during simulated aircraft landing. Combined Abstracts of 2009 Australian Psychology Conferences (pp. 40-40). Melbourne, Australia: The Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 40

End Page


  • 40

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Australia

Abstract


  • The present study examined whether the visual perception of geographical ground slant was accurate

    during simulated aircraft landings when the simulated ground slant, glideslope and aircraft pitch are

    varied. Sixteen participants viewed brief motion sequences simulating aircraft landing approaches

    towards a runway. After 4s the motion ceased and they then had to adjust the geographical slant of the

    runway so it appeared horizontal (by rotating the ground plane around the simulated aimpoint using a

    joystick). Results indicated that perceived ground slant not only varied with the simulated ground slant,

    but also with changes to the simulated glideslope. Large simulated ground slants (over 6 deg) were

    overestimated, while small simulated ground slants (under 6 deg) were underestimated. As the glideslope increased, ground slant overestimation also increased. Perceived ground slant was found to be robust to changes in simulated aircraft pitch. Based on these results, it seems likely that pilot misperceptions of glideslope may be due in some part to misperceptions of geographical ground slant. These results also have important implications for pilots landing on upsloping or downsloping runways, as they will be more likely to overshoot or land short of their desired touchdown point.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Murray, R. & Palmisano, S. A. (2009). Factors effecting the perception of ground slant during simulated aircraft landing. Combined Abstracts of 2009 Australian Psychology Conferences (pp. 40-40). Melbourne, Australia: The Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 40

End Page


  • 40

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Australia