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The role of eye movements in self-motion perception

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • As we move through the world, we produce optic flow that our eyes capture to provide a percept of self

    motion. While object motions in the scene may mask these visual cues to self motion, the visual system

    attempts to disentangle the dynamic pattern of visual motion to recover its original causes. Incorrect

    attribution of visual motion to self motion results in visual illusions of self motion, or vection. We examined the role that eye movements play in capturing optic flow information for the generation of vection. Visual self-motion displays which simulate oscillatory or jittering head movements were shown to induce ocular following responses (OFR). These compensatory eye movements are thought to be mediated by activity in extra-striate visual cortex. We further examined the dynamics of the OFR using infrared video oculography as participants viewed optic flow simulating inter-aural head oscillation and translation in depth. The concurrent acquisition of instantaneous vection strength measures was obtained and related to changes in OFR activity. Under the conditions of this study, we found that vection was strongest when these eye movements were suppressed, suggesting that the experience of vection may relate to distributed activity in brain regions other than those mediating the OFR.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kim, J. & Palmisano, S. A. (2009). The role of eye movements in self-motion perception. Combined Abstracts of 2009 Australian Psychology Conferences (pp. 32-32). Melbourne, Australia: The Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 32

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Australia

Abstract


  • As we move through the world, we produce optic flow that our eyes capture to provide a percept of self

    motion. While object motions in the scene may mask these visual cues to self motion, the visual system

    attempts to disentangle the dynamic pattern of visual motion to recover its original causes. Incorrect

    attribution of visual motion to self motion results in visual illusions of self motion, or vection. We examined the role that eye movements play in capturing optic flow information for the generation of vection. Visual self-motion displays which simulate oscillatory or jittering head movements were shown to induce ocular following responses (OFR). These compensatory eye movements are thought to be mediated by activity in extra-striate visual cortex. We further examined the dynamics of the OFR using infrared video oculography as participants viewed optic flow simulating inter-aural head oscillation and translation in depth. The concurrent acquisition of instantaneous vection strength measures was obtained and related to changes in OFR activity. Under the conditions of this study, we found that vection was strongest when these eye movements were suppressed, suggesting that the experience of vection may relate to distributed activity in brain regions other than those mediating the OFR.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kim, J. & Palmisano, S. A. (2009). The role of eye movements in self-motion perception. Combined Abstracts of 2009 Australian Psychology Conferences (pp. 32-32). Melbourne, Australia: The Australian Psychological Society.

Start Page


  • 32

End Page


  • 32

Place Of Publication


  • Melbourne, Australia