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Habituation of the orienting reflex and the development of preliminary process theory

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The orienting reflex (OR), elicited by an innocuous stimulus, can be regarded as a model of the organismÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs interaction with its environment, and has been described as the unit of attentional processing. A major determinant of the OR is the novelty of the eliciting stimulus, generally operationalised in terms of its reduction with stimulus repetition, the effects of which are commonly described in habituation terms. This paper provides an overview of a research programme, spanning more than 30 years, investigating psychophysiological aspects of the OR in humans. The major complication in this research is that the numerous physiological measures used as dependent variables in the OR context fail to jointly covary with stimulus parameters. This has led to the development of the Preliminary Process Theory (PPT) of the OR to accommodate the complexity of the observed stimulusÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂresponse patterns. PPT is largely grounded in autonomic measures, and current work is attempting to integrate electroencephalographic measures, particularly components in the event-related brain potentials reflecting aspects of stimulus processing. The emphasis in the current presentation is on the use of the defining criteria of the habituation phenomenon, and Groves and ThompsonÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs Dual-process Theory, in the development of PPT.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Barry, R. J. (2009). Habituation of the orienting reflex and the development of preliminary process theory. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 92 (2), 235-242.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-67349256853

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3331

Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 235

End Page


  • 242

Volume


  • 92

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.elsevier.com.ezproxy.uow.edu.au/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622924/description#description

Abstract


  • The orienting reflex (OR), elicited by an innocuous stimulus, can be regarded as a model of the organismÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs interaction with its environment, and has been described as the unit of attentional processing. A major determinant of the OR is the novelty of the eliciting stimulus, generally operationalised in terms of its reduction with stimulus repetition, the effects of which are commonly described in habituation terms. This paper provides an overview of a research programme, spanning more than 30 years, investigating psychophysiological aspects of the OR in humans. The major complication in this research is that the numerous physiological measures used as dependent variables in the OR context fail to jointly covary with stimulus parameters. This has led to the development of the Preliminary Process Theory (PPT) of the OR to accommodate the complexity of the observed stimulusÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂresponse patterns. PPT is largely grounded in autonomic measures, and current work is attempting to integrate electroencephalographic measures, particularly components in the event-related brain potentials reflecting aspects of stimulus processing. The emphasis in the current presentation is on the use of the defining criteria of the habituation phenomenon, and Groves and ThompsonÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs Dual-process Theory, in the development of PPT.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Barry, R. J. (2009). Habituation of the orienting reflex and the development of preliminary process theory. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 92 (2), 235-242.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-67349256853

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/3331

Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 235

End Page


  • 242

Volume


  • 92

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.elsevier.com.ezproxy.uow.edu.au/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622924/description#description