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Using RFID to Overcome Inventory Control Challenges: A Proof of Concept

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Using a Proof of Concept approach, this paper examines RFIDÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs impact on inventory control of a small-to-medium retailer. Results indicate that RFID technology can function effectively in a small-to-medium hardware environment. Also, the majority of the simulations recorded reasonable read rates even though the simulations were set up over a short period of time without a great deal of fine-tuning. Moreover, RFID could have a positive impact on the inventory-related processes of the organisation by either streamlining or formalizing them and facilitate the electronic storage of information captured in real-time, relating to the movement of stock and the amount of stock held, providing visibility to members of the organisation. Despite these encouraging findings in relation to using RFID for inventory

    control purposes within the small-to-medium retailer, it is recommended that other alternatives aimed at improving the inventory control practices of the organisation be investigated before committing to the implementation of RFID.

Authors


  •   Hamilton, Dane (external author)
  •   Michael, Katina
  •   Fosso Wamba, Samuel (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Hamilton, D., Michael, K. & Fosso Wamba, S. (2009). Using RFID to Overcome Inventory Control Challenges: A Proof of Concept. In D. Zhang, M. Portmann, A. Tan & J. Indulska (Eds.), Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing (pp. 353-366). Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70350655228

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/commpapers/3017

Start Page


  • 353

End Page


  • 366

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.itee.uq.edu.au/~uic09/

Abstract


  • Using a Proof of Concept approach, this paper examines RFIDÃÂâÃÂÃÂÃÂÃÂs impact on inventory control of a small-to-medium retailer. Results indicate that RFID technology can function effectively in a small-to-medium hardware environment. Also, the majority of the simulations recorded reasonable read rates even though the simulations were set up over a short period of time without a great deal of fine-tuning. Moreover, RFID could have a positive impact on the inventory-related processes of the organisation by either streamlining or formalizing them and facilitate the electronic storage of information captured in real-time, relating to the movement of stock and the amount of stock held, providing visibility to members of the organisation. Despite these encouraging findings in relation to using RFID for inventory

    control purposes within the small-to-medium retailer, it is recommended that other alternatives aimed at improving the inventory control practices of the organisation be investigated before committing to the implementation of RFID.

Authors


  •   Hamilton, Dane (external author)
  •   Michael, Katina
  •   Fosso Wamba, Samuel (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Hamilton, D., Michael, K. & Fosso Wamba, S. (2009). Using RFID to Overcome Inventory Control Challenges: A Proof of Concept. In D. Zhang, M. Portmann, A. Tan & J. Indulska (Eds.), Ubiquitous Intelligence and Computing (pp. 353-366). Berlin, Germany: Springer Verlag.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-70350655228

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/commpapers/3017

Start Page


  • 353

End Page


  • 366

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.itee.uq.edu.au/~uic09/