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Mechanically strong, electrically conductive, and biocompatible graphene

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Research on graphene was originally motivated by its

    peculiar electrical transport properties and the promise of

    future applications in nanoelectronics.[1,2] Graphene sheets,

    owing to their exceptional thermal and mechanical properties

    and high electrical conductivity, are also of great interest to

    serve as new nanoscale building blocks to create unique

    macroscopic materials.[3–5] Recent studies have shown that

    graphene sheets can be prepared in large quantity through

    chemical conversion from graphite,[6–12] which has facilitated

    the fabrication of graphene-based electronic devices[13,14] and

    has also made it possible to create new bulk materials

    comprising graphene sheets for a broader range of applications.[

    3–5,15,16] For example, it has been recently demonstrated

    that chemically modified graphene sheets can be dispersed

    throughout a polymeric[3] or inorganic matrix[15] to make

    electrically conducting composites with a percolation threshold

    as low as 0.1 vol %. Thin graphene films have also been used as

    potential transparent electrodes for solar cells.[16] More

    recently, Ruoff and co-workers have demonstrated that graphene

    oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in water can be assembled into

    a well-ordered structure under a directional flow, yielding

    ultrastrong GO paper.[4] GO paper is superior to many other

    paperlike materials in stiffness and strength, however, a lack of

    electrical conductivity limits its use. Although GO paper can

    be rendered conductive by thermal annealing, the structure

    and mechanical properties seriously deteriorate after this

    treatment (see below for further discussion).

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Chen, H., Muller, M. B., Gilmore, K. J., Wallace, G. G. & Li, D. (2008). Mechanically strong, electrically conductive, and biocompatible graphene. Advanced Materials, 20 (18), 3557-3561.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-54949098149

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/3557

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 4

Start Page


  • 3557

End Page


  • 3561

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 18

Abstract


  • Research on graphene was originally motivated by its

    peculiar electrical transport properties and the promise of

    future applications in nanoelectronics.[1,2] Graphene sheets,

    owing to their exceptional thermal and mechanical properties

    and high electrical conductivity, are also of great interest to

    serve as new nanoscale building blocks to create unique

    macroscopic materials.[3–5] Recent studies have shown that

    graphene sheets can be prepared in large quantity through

    chemical conversion from graphite,[6–12] which has facilitated

    the fabrication of graphene-based electronic devices[13,14] and

    has also made it possible to create new bulk materials

    comprising graphene sheets for a broader range of applications.[

    3–5,15,16] For example, it has been recently demonstrated

    that chemically modified graphene sheets can be dispersed

    throughout a polymeric[3] or inorganic matrix[15] to make

    electrically conducting composites with a percolation threshold

    as low as 0.1 vol %. Thin graphene films have also been used as

    potential transparent electrodes for solar cells.[16] More

    recently, Ruoff and co-workers have demonstrated that graphene

    oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in water can be assembled into

    a well-ordered structure under a directional flow, yielding

    ultrastrong GO paper.[4] GO paper is superior to many other

    paperlike materials in stiffness and strength, however, a lack of

    electrical conductivity limits its use. Although GO paper can

    be rendered conductive by thermal annealing, the structure

    and mechanical properties seriously deteriorate after this

    treatment (see below for further discussion).

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Chen, H., Muller, M. B., Gilmore, K. J., Wallace, G. G. & Li, D. (2008). Mechanically strong, electrically conductive, and biocompatible graphene. Advanced Materials, 20 (18), 3557-3561.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-54949098149

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/3557

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 4

Start Page


  • 3557

End Page


  • 3561

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 18