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Desiccation protects two Antarctic mosses from ultraviolet-B induced DNA damage

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Antarctic mosses live in a frozen desert, and are characterised by the ability to survive desiccation. They can tolerate multiple desiccation-rehydration events over the summer growing season. As a result of recent ozone depletion, such mosses may also be exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation while desiccated. The ultraviolet-B susceptibility of Antarctic moss species was examined in a laboratory experiment that tested whether desiccated or hydrated mosses accumulated more DNA damage under enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation. Accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine (6ÿ4) pyrimidone dimers was measured in moss samples collected from the field and then exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation in either a desiccated or hydrated state. Two cosmopolitan species, Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. and Bryum pseudotriquetrum (Hedw.) Gaertn., B.Mey. & Scherb, were protected from DNA damage when desiccated, with accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers reduced by at least 60% relative to hydrated moss. The endemic Schistidium antarctici (Cardot) L.I. Savicz & Smirnova accumulated more DNA damage than the other species and desiccation was not protective in this species. The cosmopolitan species remarkable ability to tolerate high ultraviolet-B exposure, especially in the desiccated state, suggests they may be better able to tolerate continued elevated ultraviolet-B radiation than the endemic species.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Turnbull, J. D., Leslie, S. J. & Robinson, S. A. (2009). Desiccation protects two Antarctic mosses from ultraviolet-B induced DNA damage. Functional Plant Biology: an international journal of plant function, 36 (3), 214-221.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-62549131241

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=6341&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/2999

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 214

End Page


  • 221

Volume


  • 36

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Antarctic mosses live in a frozen desert, and are characterised by the ability to survive desiccation. They can tolerate multiple desiccation-rehydration events over the summer growing season. As a result of recent ozone depletion, such mosses may also be exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation while desiccated. The ultraviolet-B susceptibility of Antarctic moss species was examined in a laboratory experiment that tested whether desiccated or hydrated mosses accumulated more DNA damage under enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation. Accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine (6ÿ4) pyrimidone dimers was measured in moss samples collected from the field and then exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation in either a desiccated or hydrated state. Two cosmopolitan species, Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. and Bryum pseudotriquetrum (Hedw.) Gaertn., B.Mey. & Scherb, were protected from DNA damage when desiccated, with accumulation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers reduced by at least 60% relative to hydrated moss. The endemic Schistidium antarctici (Cardot) L.I. Savicz & Smirnova accumulated more DNA damage than the other species and desiccation was not protective in this species. The cosmopolitan species remarkable ability to tolerate high ultraviolet-B exposure, especially in the desiccated state, suggests they may be better able to tolerate continued elevated ultraviolet-B radiation than the endemic species.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Turnbull, J. D., Leslie, S. J. & Robinson, S. A. (2009). Desiccation protects two Antarctic mosses from ultraviolet-B induced DNA damage. Functional Plant Biology: an international journal of plant function, 36 (3), 214-221.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-62549131241

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=6341&context=scipapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/scipapers/2999

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 214

End Page


  • 221

Volume


  • 36

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • Australia