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Polyunsaturated fatty acids intakes in children with ADHD

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background Research has shown a direct relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). However, no study to date has investigated relationships

    between ADHD and dietary n-3 PUFA intake

    Objectives To assess dietary PUFA intakes in children with ADHD, to compare these intakes to the previously

    published estimates of childrens PUFA intake using the data from the Australian National Nutrition Survey (NNS),

    and to determine if there is a relationship between dietary n-3 PUFA intakes and ADHD symptoms.

    Design Eighty six three-day weighed food records were collected from children with ADHD. Their dietary PUFA

    intakes were analysed using FoodWorks nutrient analysis software package. Results were compared to the

    previously published estimates of childrens PUFA intake from the NNS and correlations between dietary PUFA

    intakes and ADHD symptoms were investigated.

    Outcomes The average (median) daily intakes of fatty acids (mg/d) are: linoleic (LA), 8425 (7745); arachidonic

    (AA), 67 (55); total n-6, 8492 (7801), alpha-linolenic (ALA), 1188 (1023), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), 30 (10),

    docosapentaenoic (DPA), 31 (19), docosahexaenoic (DHA), 39 (17), long chain (LC) n-3 (addition of EPA, DPA

    and DHA), 95 (68) and total n-3, 1282 (1133). The mean daily intake of LA, total n-6 and DHA were significantly

    lower when compared to the NNS (P<0.05). Despite lower DHA intakes, no significant correlations were found

    between any fatty acids and ADHD symptoms. However, children with ADHD consumed significantly less

    fish/seafood, meat and eggs when compared to the NNS.

    Conclusion Children with ADHD consume less DHA, fish/seafood, meat and eggs than the NNS. Hence, these

    children are encouraged to increase their consumption of LC n-3 PUFA containing foods.

Authors


  •   Ng, K H. (external author)
  •   Reece, Lauren (external author)
  •   Sinn, Natalie (external author)
  •   Meyer, Barbara J.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Ng, K. H., Reece, L., Sinn, N. & Meyer, B. (2008). Polyunsaturated fatty acids intakes in children with ADHD. In Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, 30 Nov - 3 Dec, Glenelg, Adelaide, South Australia. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17 (Supplement 3), S98-S98.

Start Page


  • S98

End Page


  • S98

Volume


  • 17

Issue


  • Supplement 3

Abstract


  • Background Research has shown a direct relationship between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). However, no study to date has investigated relationships

    between ADHD and dietary n-3 PUFA intake

    Objectives To assess dietary PUFA intakes in children with ADHD, to compare these intakes to the previously

    published estimates of childrens PUFA intake using the data from the Australian National Nutrition Survey (NNS),

    and to determine if there is a relationship between dietary n-3 PUFA intakes and ADHD symptoms.

    Design Eighty six three-day weighed food records were collected from children with ADHD. Their dietary PUFA

    intakes were analysed using FoodWorks nutrient analysis software package. Results were compared to the

    previously published estimates of childrens PUFA intake from the NNS and correlations between dietary PUFA

    intakes and ADHD symptoms were investigated.

    Outcomes The average (median) daily intakes of fatty acids (mg/d) are: linoleic (LA), 8425 (7745); arachidonic

    (AA), 67 (55); total n-6, 8492 (7801), alpha-linolenic (ALA), 1188 (1023), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), 30 (10),

    docosapentaenoic (DPA), 31 (19), docosahexaenoic (DHA), 39 (17), long chain (LC) n-3 (addition of EPA, DPA

    and DHA), 95 (68) and total n-3, 1282 (1133). The mean daily intake of LA, total n-6 and DHA were significantly

    lower when compared to the NNS (P<0.05). Despite lower DHA intakes, no significant correlations were found

    between any fatty acids and ADHD symptoms. However, children with ADHD consumed significantly less

    fish/seafood, meat and eggs when compared to the NNS.

    Conclusion Children with ADHD consume less DHA, fish/seafood, meat and eggs than the NNS. Hence, these

    children are encouraged to increase their consumption of LC n-3 PUFA containing foods.

Authors


  •   Ng, K H. (external author)
  •   Reece, Lauren (external author)
  •   Sinn, Natalie (external author)
  •   Meyer, Barbara J.

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Ng, K. H., Reece, L., Sinn, N. & Meyer, B. (2008). Polyunsaturated fatty acids intakes in children with ADHD. In Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia, 30 Nov - 3 Dec, Glenelg, Adelaide, South Australia. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17 (Supplement 3), S98-S98.

Start Page


  • S98

End Page


  • S98

Volume


  • 17

Issue


  • Supplement 3