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Microchip implants for humans as unique identifiers: a case study on VeriChip

Conference Paper


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Abstract


  • Microchip implants for humans are not new. The installation of pacemakers in humans and a great number of other medical innovations for prosthesis are now considered straightforward procedures. Today we have even realised the potential for microchip implants to be embedded inside the body of humans for the purpose of acting as unique lifetime identifiers (ULIs). Tiny radiofrequency identification (RFID) devices are now being utilised to store a unique 16-digit identification number.

    A significant paradigm shift has occurred in how technology is being utilised by humans and where it is being applied, requiring a commensurate ethical response from the broader community. For instance, what does it mean for technology to be embedded beneath the skin in a perfectly healthy human being for the purposes of easy identification or even bodily amplification? Is an implant for non-medical purposes a potential breach in a humans rights? Are implant IDs, even if consent has been granted by the recipient, in direct conflict with a States privacy laws? And what happens if an implant cannot be removed on demand because it has become intertwined with tissue in the body?

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Michael, K., Michael, M. G. & Ip, R. (2008). Microchip implants for humans as unique identifiers: a case study on VeriChip. In N. Manders-Huits (Eds.), Conference on Ethics, Technology, and Identity (ETI) (pp. 81-84). Delft: Delft University of Technology.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1594&context=infopapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/infopapers/586

Start Page


  • 81

End Page


  • 84

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.ethicsandtechnology.eu/index.php/site/accommodation_eti_2008

Abstract


  • Microchip implants for humans are not new. The installation of pacemakers in humans and a great number of other medical innovations for prosthesis are now considered straightforward procedures. Today we have even realised the potential for microchip implants to be embedded inside the body of humans for the purpose of acting as unique lifetime identifiers (ULIs). Tiny radiofrequency identification (RFID) devices are now being utilised to store a unique 16-digit identification number.

    A significant paradigm shift has occurred in how technology is being utilised by humans and where it is being applied, requiring a commensurate ethical response from the broader community. For instance, what does it mean for technology to be embedded beneath the skin in a perfectly healthy human being for the purposes of easy identification or even bodily amplification? Is an implant for non-medical purposes a potential breach in a humans rights? Are implant IDs, even if consent has been granted by the recipient, in direct conflict with a States privacy laws? And what happens if an implant cannot be removed on demand because it has become intertwined with tissue in the body?

Publication Date


  • 2008

Citation


  • Michael, K., Michael, M. G. & Ip, R. (2008). Microchip implants for humans as unique identifiers: a case study on VeriChip. In N. Manders-Huits (Eds.), Conference on Ethics, Technology, and Identity (ETI) (pp. 81-84). Delft: Delft University of Technology.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1594&context=infopapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/infopapers/586

Start Page


  • 81

End Page


  • 84

Place Of Publication


  • http://www.ethicsandtechnology.eu/index.php/site/accommodation_eti_2008