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Counterfactual thinking in response to hypothetical breast cancer scenarios: a pilot study

Conference Paper


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Abstract


  • This paper examined womens counterfactual

    thoughts in response to hypothetical scenarios about

    early versus late breast cancer diagnoses.Women

    aged 50 and over (N=29) read hypothetical

    scenarios about the experience of fictitious women

    of mammography screening age and completed

    counterfactual statements from the protagonists

    perspective.In two scenarios, the protagonist failed

    to attend mammography screening regularly and

    was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer; the

    third scenario depicted a woman who had

    mammograms biennially and received an early-stage

    breast cancer diagnosis.Consistent with past

    literature on counterfactual thinking, participants

    generated exclusively upward counterfactuals from

    the two late-diagnosis scenarios, and predominantly

    downward counterfactuals from the early-diagnosis

    scenario.Furthermore, participants primarily

    focussed on what the protagonist could personally

    have done differently to lead to a different

    outcome.Hence health communication messages

    that prompt women to think counterfactually may

    encourage them to adopt greater personal

    responsibility toward routine mammography

    screening.

UOW Authors


  •   Chan, Amy
  •   Jones, Sandra C. (external author)
  •   Rich, Karen T. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • Chan, A. Y.C., Jones, S. C. & Rich, K. (2007). Counterfactual thinking in response to hypothetical breast cancer scenarios: a pilot study. In K. H. Moore (Eds.), Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference (pp. 67-71). Melbourne, VIC: Australian Psychological Society Ltd.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2876&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/1823

Start Page


  • 67

End Page


  • 71

Place Of Publication


  • www.apsconference.com.au

Abstract


  • This paper examined womens counterfactual

    thoughts in response to hypothetical scenarios about

    early versus late breast cancer diagnoses.Women

    aged 50 and over (N=29) read hypothetical

    scenarios about the experience of fictitious women

    of mammography screening age and completed

    counterfactual statements from the protagonists

    perspective.In two scenarios, the protagonist failed

    to attend mammography screening regularly and

    was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer; the

    third scenario depicted a woman who had

    mammograms biennially and received an early-stage

    breast cancer diagnosis.Consistent with past

    literature on counterfactual thinking, participants

    generated exclusively upward counterfactuals from

    the two late-diagnosis scenarios, and predominantly

    downward counterfactuals from the early-diagnosis

    scenario.Furthermore, participants primarily

    focussed on what the protagonist could personally

    have done differently to lead to a different

    outcome.Hence health communication messages

    that prompt women to think counterfactually may

    encourage them to adopt greater personal

    responsibility toward routine mammography

    screening.

UOW Authors


  •   Chan, Amy
  •   Jones, Sandra C. (external author)
  •   Rich, Karen T. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • Chan, A. Y.C., Jones, S. C. & Rich, K. (2007). Counterfactual thinking in response to hypothetical breast cancer scenarios: a pilot study. In K. H. Moore (Eds.), Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference (pp. 67-71). Melbourne, VIC: Australian Psychological Society Ltd.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2876&context=hbspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/1823

Start Page


  • 67

End Page


  • 71

Place Of Publication


  • www.apsconference.com.au