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Participant behaviours during a web-based diet history interview: the influence of food type selection on behaviour

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Social desirability bias in food type selection may influence patient

    behaviour during diet history interviews; however, face to face diet

    history interviews do not allow for participant behaviours to be captured.

    To determine whether a relationship exists between the foods

    selected by the participant and observed behaviours, video data was

    analysed for n = 11 adult volunteers with type 2 diabetes mellitus using

    an automated diet history website. Participant log files showing time

    taken and item selection were downloaded from the website. Behaviours

    from the videos and food item selections from the log files were

    grouped, and matched for time of occurrence. The frequency and proportion of behaviours per food group were calculated. Trends

    between food group and behaviour group were determined using

    weighted chi-square analyses. Sixteen behaviour groups were constructed

    from 155 behaviours and 11 food groups were formed.

    Adjusted for voice alteration; the most commonly observed behaviour

    was non-computer interaction in the savoury sauces (14.0%) group; self

    touching of the face in the sugary foods (20.2%), and fats and oils

    (16.9%) groups; shifting in the chair in the takeaway food group

    (20.2%); and head movement (21.6%) in the alcoholic beverages group.

    Self-touching of the face, head movement, postural movement, and

    movement in chair were observed significantly more often than other

    behaviours across all food groups. Food type appears to influence

    behaviour during diet history interviews. This may have implications

    for the types of questions asked by dietitians during face to face diet

    history interviews.

Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • De Agnoli, K., Probst, Y., Batterham, M. & Tapsell, L. C. (2007). Participant behaviours during a web-based diet history interview: the influence of food type selection on behaviour. In Dietitians Association of Australia National Conference, 24-26 May, Hobart. Nutrition & Dietetics, 64 (Suppl. 1), S12-S13.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/2489

Start Page


  • S12

End Page


  • S13

Volume


  • 64

Issue


  • Suppl. 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Social desirability bias in food type selection may influence patient

    behaviour during diet history interviews; however, face to face diet

    history interviews do not allow for participant behaviours to be captured.

    To determine whether a relationship exists between the foods

    selected by the participant and observed behaviours, video data was

    analysed for n = 11 adult volunteers with type 2 diabetes mellitus using

    an automated diet history website. Participant log files showing time

    taken and item selection were downloaded from the website. Behaviours

    from the videos and food item selections from the log files were

    grouped, and matched for time of occurrence. The frequency and proportion of behaviours per food group were calculated. Trends

    between food group and behaviour group were determined using

    weighted chi-square analyses. Sixteen behaviour groups were constructed

    from 155 behaviours and 11 food groups were formed.

    Adjusted for voice alteration; the most commonly observed behaviour

    was non-computer interaction in the savoury sauces (14.0%) group; self

    touching of the face in the sugary foods (20.2%), and fats and oils

    (16.9%) groups; shifting in the chair in the takeaway food group

    (20.2%); and head movement (21.6%) in the alcoholic beverages group.

    Self-touching of the face, head movement, postural movement, and

    movement in chair were observed significantly more often than other

    behaviours across all food groups. Food type appears to influence

    behaviour during diet history interviews. This may have implications

    for the types of questions asked by dietitians during face to face diet

    history interviews.

Publication Date


  • 2007

Citation


  • De Agnoli, K., Probst, Y., Batterham, M. & Tapsell, L. C. (2007). Participant behaviours during a web-based diet history interview: the influence of food type selection on behaviour. In Dietitians Association of Australia National Conference, 24-26 May, Hobart. Nutrition & Dietetics, 64 (Suppl. 1), S12-S13.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/hbspapers/2489

Start Page


  • S12

End Page


  • S13

Volume


  • 64

Issue


  • Suppl. 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia