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A survey about postoperative delirium in older patients among nurses and anaesthetists: implications for future practice and policy

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Background

    Postoperative delirium is a major complication associated with anaesthesia and surgery, more commonly seen in older people.

    Aims

    The aims of this study were to explore the knowledge and understanding of anaesthetists and nurses involved in anaesthesia through their responses to two case scenarios of postoperative delirium experienced by older people.

    Methods

    A 30-item online survey was sent to 500 potential respondents.

    Results

    Two hundred and twenty-six practitioners from Australia, New Zealand and Scotland responded. Most had no workplace protocols for anaesthesia planning in older people. There was substantial variability in practice in relation to postoperative delirium screening, detection, prevention and management.

    Conclusions

    Improvements in education and awareness, together with a more coherent approach, for example, as recommended in the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guidelines, could help to reduce the impact of postoperative delirium in older people. This should be combined with ongoing research into perioperative optimisation of detection, prevention and management of postoperative delirium.

Authors


  •   Igwe, Ezinne O.
  •   Professor Victoria Traynor
  •   Rodgers, Sheila E. (external author)
  •   Waite, Alasdair (external author)
  •   MacLullich, Alasdair M.J. (external author)
  •   Foo, Irwin (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Igwe, E. O., Traynor, V., Rodgers, S., Waite, A., MacLullich, A. & Foo, I. (2020). A survey about postoperative delirium in older patients among nurses and anaesthetists: implications for future practice and policy. Journal of Research in Nursing, Online First

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85091181701

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2698&context=smhpapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1664

Volume


  • Online First

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Background

    Postoperative delirium is a major complication associated with anaesthesia and surgery, more commonly seen in older people.

    Aims

    The aims of this study were to explore the knowledge and understanding of anaesthetists and nurses involved in anaesthesia through their responses to two case scenarios of postoperative delirium experienced by older people.

    Methods

    A 30-item online survey was sent to 500 potential respondents.

    Results

    Two hundred and twenty-six practitioners from Australia, New Zealand and Scotland responded. Most had no workplace protocols for anaesthesia planning in older people. There was substantial variability in practice in relation to postoperative delirium screening, detection, prevention and management.

    Conclusions

    Improvements in education and awareness, together with a more coherent approach, for example, as recommended in the European Society of Anaesthesiology Guidelines, could help to reduce the impact of postoperative delirium in older people. This should be combined with ongoing research into perioperative optimisation of detection, prevention and management of postoperative delirium.

Authors


  •   Igwe, Ezinne O.
  •   Professor Victoria Traynor
  •   Rodgers, Sheila E. (external author)
  •   Waite, Alasdair (external author)
  •   MacLullich, Alasdair M.J. (external author)
  •   Foo, Irwin (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Igwe, E. O., Traynor, V., Rodgers, S., Waite, A., MacLullich, A. & Foo, I. (2020). A survey about postoperative delirium in older patients among nurses and anaesthetists: implications for future practice and policy. Journal of Research in Nursing, Online First

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85091181701

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2698&context=smhpapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1664

Volume


  • Online First

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom