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Are female soldiers satisfied with the fit and function of body armour?

Journal Article


Abstract


  • © 2020 Elsevier Ltd Design and development of contemporary military body armour has traditionally focused primarily on male soldiers. As the anthropometric body dimensions of male and female soldiers differ, we aimed to determine whether current body armour was meeting fit and functional requirements of female soldiers. One-hundred and forty-seven female Australian Defence Force soldiers completed a 59-item questionnaire regarding the fit and function of current body armour. Most (68%) participants reported wearing ill-fitting body armour, which was associated with increased total musculoskeletal pain and discomfort, as well as pain at the shoulders, abdomen, and hips. Body armour that was too large was more likely to interfere with task performance when it was integrated with a combat belt, as well as when female soldiers performed operationally representative tasks. Modifying body armour design and sizing to cater to the anthropometric dimensions of female soldiers is recommended.

Authors


  •   Coltman, Celeste (external author)
  •   Steele, Julie R.
  •   Spratford, Wayne (external author)
  •   Molloy, Richard (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Coltman, C., Steele, J., Spratford, W. & Molloy, R. (2020). Are female soldiers satisfied with the fit and function of body armour?. Applied Ergonomics, 89 103197.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85088872084

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1517

Start Page


  • 103197

Volume


  • 89

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • © 2020 Elsevier Ltd Design and development of contemporary military body armour has traditionally focused primarily on male soldiers. As the anthropometric body dimensions of male and female soldiers differ, we aimed to determine whether current body armour was meeting fit and functional requirements of female soldiers. One-hundred and forty-seven female Australian Defence Force soldiers completed a 59-item questionnaire regarding the fit and function of current body armour. Most (68%) participants reported wearing ill-fitting body armour, which was associated with increased total musculoskeletal pain and discomfort, as well as pain at the shoulders, abdomen, and hips. Body armour that was too large was more likely to interfere with task performance when it was integrated with a combat belt, as well as when female soldiers performed operationally representative tasks. Modifying body armour design and sizing to cater to the anthropometric dimensions of female soldiers is recommended.

Authors


  •   Coltman, Celeste (external author)
  •   Steele, Julie R.
  •   Spratford, Wayne (external author)
  •   Molloy, Richard (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Coltman, C., Steele, J., Spratford, W. & Molloy, R. (2020). Are female soldiers satisfied with the fit and function of body armour?. Applied Ergonomics, 89 103197.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85088872084

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1517

Start Page


  • 103197

Volume


  • 89

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom