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Using a “Pracademic” lens to determine professional development to enact WIL at universities

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • A grant enabled academic and professional staff to undertake collaborative research on Work Integrated Learning (WIL) for its potential expansion across higher-education institutions to embed employability as part of the student experience. The project proposed to capture the diverse practices of the ‘Pracademics’ facilitating different WIL activities to deeply explore specific professional capabilities that facilitate WIL ‘work’ for their learners. The “thick”, descriptive, data outlined the practice architectures - doings, saying, relatings - rather than categorising individuals by role or background (academic, professional, practitioner). Preliminary findings reveal that – beyond teaching practices - ‘Pracademic’ WIL practices include collaborating, innovating, networking, selling and negotiating to facilitate WIL but also legitimising and subverting for WIL to be enacted in the university system itself. Through examining the preliminary findings from the Grant, Research Development Framework from Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC) Limited and the Griffith Learning & Teaching Capabilities Framework we can now begin to understand how academics and “pracademics” are similar or different.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Sheridan, L., McDonnell, T., Price, O., Sheridan, L., Pocius, R. & Cunial, R. (2019). Using a “Pracademic” lens to determine professional development to enact WIL at universities. National Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services Conference

Abstract


  • A grant enabled academic and professional staff to undertake collaborative research on Work Integrated Learning (WIL) for its potential expansion across higher-education institutions to embed employability as part of the student experience. The project proposed to capture the diverse practices of the ‘Pracademics’ facilitating different WIL activities to deeply explore specific professional capabilities that facilitate WIL ‘work’ for their learners. The “thick”, descriptive, data outlined the practice architectures - doings, saying, relatings - rather than categorising individuals by role or background (academic, professional, practitioner). Preliminary findings reveal that – beyond teaching practices - ‘Pracademic’ WIL practices include collaborating, innovating, networking, selling and negotiating to facilitate WIL but also legitimising and subverting for WIL to be enacted in the university system itself. Through examining the preliminary findings from the Grant, Research Development Framework from Careers Research and Advisory Centre (CRAC) Limited and the Griffith Learning & Teaching Capabilities Framework we can now begin to understand how academics and “pracademics” are similar or different.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Sheridan, L., McDonnell, T., Price, O., Sheridan, L., Pocius, R. & Cunial, R. (2019). Using a “Pracademic” lens to determine professional development to enact WIL at universities. National Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services Conference