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Protecting our own copyright: combating the piracy of academic content by students

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • This presentation discusses the issues associated with student piracy of learning materials provided to them for their studies. It responds to peer to peer (P2P) file sharing by students which now extends beyond sharing their own materials, such as study notes, to sharing the learning resources of tutors, lecturers, institutions and publishers, mimicking other forms of copyright piracy (images, film and sound). This type of behaviour could be labelled as a form of academic piracy. Students are uploading academic material that is not their property - and without their copyright - seeking to benefit from 'sharing'. There are a growing number of internet sites encouraging student academic piracy behaviours by soliciting academic content uploads and even providing incentives to 'share' in terms of money, credit, exchange or acknowledgements.

    Within this context, this presentation outlines strategies that can be used to discourage the practice of academic piracy. There will be an emphasis on pre-emptive measures - ranging from how to engage students in class discussions to more pragmatic labelling techniques - in an effort to contain and limit academic content sharing. Pre-emptive approaches can reduce the necessary time required in the longer term to protect our own copyright by tracking down our materials on the web.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Sheridan, L. M. & Rogerson, A. M. (2020). Protecting our own copyright: combating the piracy of academic content by students. International Center for Academic Integrity Annual Conference International Center for Academic Integrity.

Abstract


  • This presentation discusses the issues associated with student piracy of learning materials provided to them for their studies. It responds to peer to peer (P2P) file sharing by students which now extends beyond sharing their own materials, such as study notes, to sharing the learning resources of tutors, lecturers, institutions and publishers, mimicking other forms of copyright piracy (images, film and sound). This type of behaviour could be labelled as a form of academic piracy. Students are uploading academic material that is not their property - and without their copyright - seeking to benefit from 'sharing'. There are a growing number of internet sites encouraging student academic piracy behaviours by soliciting academic content uploads and even providing incentives to 'share' in terms of money, credit, exchange or acknowledgements.

    Within this context, this presentation outlines strategies that can be used to discourage the practice of academic piracy. There will be an emphasis on pre-emptive measures - ranging from how to engage students in class discussions to more pragmatic labelling techniques - in an effort to contain and limit academic content sharing. Pre-emptive approaches can reduce the necessary time required in the longer term to protect our own copyright by tracking down our materials on the web.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Sheridan, L. M. & Rogerson, A. M. (2020). Protecting our own copyright: combating the piracy of academic content by students. International Center for Academic Integrity Annual Conference International Center for Academic Integrity.