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Three cooperative pathways to solving a collective weed management problem

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The spread of pest plants is a trans-boundary problem that causes losses to biodiversity and disrupts ecosystems. Much social research into, and policy development for, weeds has conceptualised their control as a problem facing individual landowners, rather than as a collective action problem. In the case of serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma), a highly invasive, noxious weed that is widespread in southeastern Australia, landowners and government staff are acutely aware that this weed is a communal problem. Analysis of semi-structured interviews revealed that landowners and agency staff believe there are three pathways available for communities to achieve greater weed control collectively. These involve sharing information, providing support and applying pressure. These pathways provide two options for future policy development. Firstly, future policies could use the findings to make minor adjustments to the way information is distributed, funding is provided and enforcement is administered. Alternatively, future policies could be refocused to acknowledge good farm management, encourage better relationships among neighbours and build on the social capital that exists in Landcare groups.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Graham, S. (2013). Three cooperative pathways to solving a collective weed management problem. Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 20 (2), 116-129.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84879776618

Number Of Pages


  • 13

Start Page


  • 116

End Page


  • 129

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • The spread of pest plants is a trans-boundary problem that causes losses to biodiversity and disrupts ecosystems. Much social research into, and policy development for, weeds has conceptualised their control as a problem facing individual landowners, rather than as a collective action problem. In the case of serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma), a highly invasive, noxious weed that is widespread in southeastern Australia, landowners and government staff are acutely aware that this weed is a communal problem. Analysis of semi-structured interviews revealed that landowners and agency staff believe there are three pathways available for communities to achieve greater weed control collectively. These involve sharing information, providing support and applying pressure. These pathways provide two options for future policy development. Firstly, future policies could use the findings to make minor adjustments to the way information is distributed, funding is provided and enforcement is administered. Alternatively, future policies could be refocused to acknowledge good farm management, encourage better relationships among neighbours and build on the social capital that exists in Landcare groups.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Graham, S. (2013). Three cooperative pathways to solving a collective weed management problem. Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 20 (2), 116-129.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84879776618

Number Of Pages


  • 13

Start Page


  • 116

End Page


  • 129

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom