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New ways of doing: Severe Behaviour Response Team evaluation findings

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The Severe Behaviour Response Teams (SBRTs) were established in 2015 by the Australian government to assist aged care homes better support people living with dementia experiencing severe and extreme responsive behaviours, otherwise known as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). This presentation describes the key findings of the independent evaluation of the program, conducted by the Centre for Health Service Development (CHSD) at the University of Wollongong over 20 months to September 2017. The evaluation collected and analysed data across three levels: 1. Client: de-identified data provided by the SBRT and review of clinical records; 2. Provider: site visits, interviews and surveys with aged care staff and SBRT consultants; and, 3. System: key stakeholder interviews, review of governance and management processes. The SBRT involves clinical experts (‘consultants’) providing on-site assessment and support within 48 hours of acceptance of referral, working closely with care home staff, families and GPs to identify potential reasons for the underlying cause of behaviours. A key aspect of the service included a period of observation allowing SBRT consultants to identify potential behavioural triggers. Building the capacity of aged care staff to better manage behaviours was also important as was brokerage funding provided for individualised short-term support and/or resources. During the evaluation period, 859 clients from 616 care homes were seen by the SBRT. Organisational characteristics such as workforce, skills/knowledge, and environmental features were identified as key factors associated with the development of responsive behaviours. The majority of behaviours were resolved with support from the SBRT: at case closure, 50% of clients had their behaviours either modified/managed or resolved and a further 18% had the ‘goals of the referral’ successfully met.The evaluation presents both practical lessons for providers and policy implications for government to improve the lives of those at risk of developing responsive behaviours.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • A. Westera, D. Fildes, S. Bird & R. Gordon, "New ways of doing: Severe Behaviour Response Team evaluation findings", 52nd Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) Conference. (2019)

Abstract


  • The Severe Behaviour Response Teams (SBRTs) were established in 2015 by the Australian government to assist aged care homes better support people living with dementia experiencing severe and extreme responsive behaviours, otherwise known as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). This presentation describes the key findings of the independent evaluation of the program, conducted by the Centre for Health Service Development (CHSD) at the University of Wollongong over 20 months to September 2017. The evaluation collected and analysed data across three levels: 1. Client: de-identified data provided by the SBRT and review of clinical records; 2. Provider: site visits, interviews and surveys with aged care staff and SBRT consultants; and, 3. System: key stakeholder interviews, review of governance and management processes. The SBRT involves clinical experts (‘consultants’) providing on-site assessment and support within 48 hours of acceptance of referral, working closely with care home staff, families and GPs to identify potential reasons for the underlying cause of behaviours. A key aspect of the service included a period of observation allowing SBRT consultants to identify potential behavioural triggers. Building the capacity of aged care staff to better manage behaviours was also important as was brokerage funding provided for individualised short-term support and/or resources. During the evaluation period, 859 clients from 616 care homes were seen by the SBRT. Organisational characteristics such as workforce, skills/knowledge, and environmental features were identified as key factors associated with the development of responsive behaviours. The majority of behaviours were resolved with support from the SBRT: at case closure, 50% of clients had their behaviours either modified/managed or resolved and a further 18% had the ‘goals of the referral’ successfully met.The evaluation presents both practical lessons for providers and policy implications for government to improve the lives of those at risk of developing responsive behaviours.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • A. Westera, D. Fildes, S. Bird & R. Gordon, "New ways of doing: Severe Behaviour Response Team evaluation findings", 52nd Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG) Conference. (2019)