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How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • © 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder groups in south-eastern Australia collectively manage weeds and the measures they use to evaluate success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of three Landcare groups—Jerrawa Creek/Upper Lachlan, MacLaughlin River and Towamba Valley—as well as government staff external to the groups. The results reveal that for all three groups collective weed control is about supporting individual weed control efforts as well as proactively engaging landholders with the worst infestations. The groups were seen to be successful because they focused on the common challenge that weeds pose to all landholders, thereby removing the shame associated with having weeds, and because they organised community events that were as much about building and maintaining social relationships as improving weed control. Groups were positive about what they had achieved as collectives of landholders, but also saw an important role for government in providing funding, engaging with landholders who were unwilling to engage directly with the group, and controlling weeds on public lands.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Graham, S. & Rogers, S. (2017). How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia. Environmental Management, 60 (3), 396-408.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85017095399

Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 396

End Page


  • 408

Volume


  • 60

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • © 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder groups in south-eastern Australia collectively manage weeds and the measures they use to evaluate success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of three Landcare groups—Jerrawa Creek/Upper Lachlan, MacLaughlin River and Towamba Valley—as well as government staff external to the groups. The results reveal that for all three groups collective weed control is about supporting individual weed control efforts as well as proactively engaging landholders with the worst infestations. The groups were seen to be successful because they focused on the common challenge that weeds pose to all landholders, thereby removing the shame associated with having weeds, and because they organised community events that were as much about building and maintaining social relationships as improving weed control. Groups were positive about what they had achieved as collectives of landholders, but also saw an important role for government in providing funding, engaging with landholders who were unwilling to engage directly with the group, and controlling weeds on public lands.

UOW Authors


Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Graham, S. & Rogers, S. (2017). How Local Landholder Groups Collectively Manage Weeds in South-Eastern Australia. Environmental Management, 60 (3), 396-408.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85017095399

Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 396

End Page


  • 408

Volume


  • 60

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United States