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Foreign ownership and female representation on corporate boards in emerging markets

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • In this study we examine the influence of foreign institutional investors on female representation on corporate

    boards of directors in emerging markets. We adopt an institutional theory lens to understand the tensions

    between two drivers of female (under)representation in the boardroom: Local institutional context and foreign

    institutional investors. We then build the argument that country-of-origin features of institutional investors

    matter for explaining their inclinations to pursue female representation on corporate boards in emerging

    markets. We develop and test hypotheses on a large longitudinal sample of firms from six emerging markets in

    Asia for the 2007-2011 period. Our findings suggest that (1) the greater a host country’s gender inequality, the

    lower the female director representation on corporate boards; (2) institutional investors originating from

    countries with lower gender inequality, will help alleviate gender inequality in the boardroom of firms located in

    countries with higher gender inequality; (3) institutional investors from countries with higher gender inequality,

    will accentuate gender inequality in the boardroom of firms located in countries with high gender inequality. We

    discuss implications and avenues for future research.

UOW Authors


  •   Heyden, Mariano (external author)
  •   Kavadis, Nikolaos (external author)
  •   Oehmichen, Jana (external author)
  •   Mamun, Abdullah Al

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Heyden, M. L. M., Kavadis, N., Oehmichen, J. & Al Mamun, A. (2017). Foreign ownership and female representation on corporate boards in emerging markets. AIB 2017 in Dubai

Abstract


  • In this study we examine the influence of foreign institutional investors on female representation on corporate

    boards of directors in emerging markets. We adopt an institutional theory lens to understand the tensions

    between two drivers of female (under)representation in the boardroom: Local institutional context and foreign

    institutional investors. We then build the argument that country-of-origin features of institutional investors

    matter for explaining their inclinations to pursue female representation on corporate boards in emerging

    markets. We develop and test hypotheses on a large longitudinal sample of firms from six emerging markets in

    Asia for the 2007-2011 period. Our findings suggest that (1) the greater a host country’s gender inequality, the

    lower the female director representation on corporate boards; (2) institutional investors originating from

    countries with lower gender inequality, will help alleviate gender inequality in the boardroom of firms located in

    countries with higher gender inequality; (3) institutional investors from countries with higher gender inequality,

    will accentuate gender inequality in the boardroom of firms located in countries with high gender inequality. We

    discuss implications and avenues for future research.

UOW Authors


  •   Heyden, Mariano (external author)
  •   Kavadis, Nikolaos (external author)
  •   Oehmichen, Jana (external author)
  •   Mamun, Abdullah Al

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Heyden, M. L. M., Kavadis, N., Oehmichen, J. & Al Mamun, A. (2017). Foreign ownership and female representation on corporate boards in emerging markets. AIB 2017 in Dubai