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Martensitic wear resistant steels alloyed with titanium

Journal Article


Abstract


  • © 2020 Elsevier B.V. The traditional approach to improving the abrasion wear resistance of martensitic steels is to increase their hardness via high carbon levels. However: (i) a higher hardness is usually accompanied by a lower toughness, negatively affecting the impact wear resistance, and (ii) increased carbon concentrations reduce weldability and complicate thermal cutting. This work explored microalloying with Ti as a method to simultaneously increase hardness and toughness via a concurrent precipitation of coarse TiMoVCN, fine TiC and fine Fe3C particles. Five plate steels containing <0.4C, <0.8Ti, Mn, Si, Cr, Mo and V (wt. %) were melted, cast, hot forged and heat treated to replicate an industrial processing technology. Dependences of mechanical properties on steel composition were studied using hardness, tensile, Charpy impact, pin-on-drum wear (two-body abrasion wear conditions) and impeller wear (two-body impact wear conditions) testing. Microstructure characterisation was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. With an increase in Ti/C ratio: hardness and strength showed a dependence with a maximum; toughness a dependence with a minimum; and wear resistance (both abrasion and impact) a dependence with a maximum. The maximum wear resistance (at Ti/C = 0.314) did not correspond to either hardness (at Ti/C = 0.905) or toughness (at Ti/C = 0.018) maximum, but matched the highest tensile strength. The fracture development at the particle-matrix interface was found to govern the wear mechanism in the studied steels.

Authors


  •   Kostryzhev, Andrew (external author)
  •   Killmore, C (external author)
  •   Yu, D (external author)
  •   Pereloma, Elena V.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Published In


Citation


  • Kostryzhev, A., Killmore, C., Yu, D. & Pereloma, E. (2020). Martensitic wear resistant steels alloyed with titanium. Wear, 446-447

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85078677582

Volume


  • 446-447

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • © 2020 Elsevier B.V. The traditional approach to improving the abrasion wear resistance of martensitic steels is to increase their hardness via high carbon levels. However: (i) a higher hardness is usually accompanied by a lower toughness, negatively affecting the impact wear resistance, and (ii) increased carbon concentrations reduce weldability and complicate thermal cutting. This work explored microalloying with Ti as a method to simultaneously increase hardness and toughness via a concurrent precipitation of coarse TiMoVCN, fine TiC and fine Fe3C particles. Five plate steels containing <0.4C, <0.8Ti, Mn, Si, Cr, Mo and V (wt. %) were melted, cast, hot forged and heat treated to replicate an industrial processing technology. Dependences of mechanical properties on steel composition were studied using hardness, tensile, Charpy impact, pin-on-drum wear (two-body abrasion wear conditions) and impeller wear (two-body impact wear conditions) testing. Microstructure characterisation was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. With an increase in Ti/C ratio: hardness and strength showed a dependence with a maximum; toughness a dependence with a minimum; and wear resistance (both abrasion and impact) a dependence with a maximum. The maximum wear resistance (at Ti/C = 0.314) did not correspond to either hardness (at Ti/C = 0.905) or toughness (at Ti/C = 0.018) maximum, but matched the highest tensile strength. The fracture development at the particle-matrix interface was found to govern the wear mechanism in the studied steels.

Authors


  •   Kostryzhev, Andrew (external author)
  •   Killmore, C (external author)
  •   Yu, D (external author)
  •   Pereloma, Elena V.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Published In


Citation


  • Kostryzhev, A., Killmore, C., Yu, D. & Pereloma, E. (2020). Martensitic wear resistant steels alloyed with titanium. Wear, 446-447

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85078677582

Volume


  • 446-447

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands