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Archaeological evidence for two separate dispersals of Neanderthals into southern Siberia

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Neanderthals were once widespread across Europe and western Asia. They also penetrated into the Altai Mountains of southern Siberia, but the geographical origin of these populations and the timing of their dispersal have remained elusive. Here we describe an archaeological assemblage from Chagyrskaya Cave, situated in the Altai foothills, where around 90,000 Middle Paleolithic artifacts and 74 Neanderthal remains have been recovered from deposits dating to between 59 and 49 thousand years ago (age range at 95.4% probability). Environmental reconstructions suggest that the Chagyrskaya hominins were adapted to the dry steppe and hunted bison. Their distinctive toolkit closely resembles Micoquian assemblages from central and eastern Europe, including the northern Caucasus, more than 3,000 kilometers to the west of Chagyrskaya Cave. At other Altai sites, evidence of earlier Neanderthal populations lacking associated Micoquian-like artifacts implies two or more Neanderthal incursions into this region. We identify eastern Europe as the most probable ancestral source region for the Chagyrskaya toolmakers, supported by DNA results linking the Neanderthal remains with populations in northern Croatia and the northern Caucasus, and providing a rare example of a long-distance, intercontinental population movement associated with a distinctive Paleolithic toolkit.

UOW Authors


  •   Kolobova, Kseniya (external author)
  •   Roberts, Richard
  •   Chabai, Victor P. (external author)
  •   Jacobs, Zenobia
  •   Krajcarz, Maciej T. (external author)
  •   Shalagina, Alena V. (external author)
  •   Krivoshapkin, Audrey I. (external author)
  •   Li, Bo
  •   Uthmeier, Thorsten (external author)
  •   Markin, Sergey V. (external author)
  •   Morley, Mike W. (external author)
  •   O¿Gorman, Kieran (external author)
  •   Rudaya, Natalia A. (external author)
  •   Talamo, Sahra (external author)
  •   Viola, Bence (external author)
  •   Derevianko, Anatoly (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Kolobova, K. A., Roberts, R. G., Chabai, V. P., Jacobs, Z., Krajcarz, M. T., Shalagina, A. V., Krivoshapkin, A. I., Li, B., Uthmeier, T., Markin, S. V., Morley, M. W., O¿Gorman, K., Rudaya, N. A., Talamo, S., Viola, B. & Derevianko, A. P. (2020). Archaeological evidence for two separate dispersals of Neanderthals into southern Siberia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA, 117 (6), 2879-2885.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85079330703

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2151&context=smhpapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1137

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 2879

End Page


  • 2885

Volume


  • 117

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Neanderthals were once widespread across Europe and western Asia. They also penetrated into the Altai Mountains of southern Siberia, but the geographical origin of these populations and the timing of their dispersal have remained elusive. Here we describe an archaeological assemblage from Chagyrskaya Cave, situated in the Altai foothills, where around 90,000 Middle Paleolithic artifacts and 74 Neanderthal remains have been recovered from deposits dating to between 59 and 49 thousand years ago (age range at 95.4% probability). Environmental reconstructions suggest that the Chagyrskaya hominins were adapted to the dry steppe and hunted bison. Their distinctive toolkit closely resembles Micoquian assemblages from central and eastern Europe, including the northern Caucasus, more than 3,000 kilometers to the west of Chagyrskaya Cave. At other Altai sites, evidence of earlier Neanderthal populations lacking associated Micoquian-like artifacts implies two or more Neanderthal incursions into this region. We identify eastern Europe as the most probable ancestral source region for the Chagyrskaya toolmakers, supported by DNA results linking the Neanderthal remains with populations in northern Croatia and the northern Caucasus, and providing a rare example of a long-distance, intercontinental population movement associated with a distinctive Paleolithic toolkit.

UOW Authors


  •   Kolobova, Kseniya (external author)
  •   Roberts, Richard
  •   Chabai, Victor P. (external author)
  •   Jacobs, Zenobia
  •   Krajcarz, Maciej T. (external author)
  •   Shalagina, Alena V. (external author)
  •   Krivoshapkin, Audrey I. (external author)
  •   Li, Bo
  •   Uthmeier, Thorsten (external author)
  •   Markin, Sergey V. (external author)
  •   Morley, Mike W. (external author)
  •   O¿Gorman, Kieran (external author)
  •   Rudaya, Natalia A. (external author)
  •   Talamo, Sahra (external author)
  •   Viola, Bence (external author)
  •   Derevianko, Anatoly (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Kolobova, K. A., Roberts, R. G., Chabai, V. P., Jacobs, Z., Krajcarz, M. T., Shalagina, A. V., Krivoshapkin, A. I., Li, B., Uthmeier, T., Markin, S. V., Morley, M. W., O¿Gorman, K., Rudaya, N. A., Talamo, S., Viola, B. & Derevianko, A. P. (2020). Archaeological evidence for two separate dispersals of Neanderthals into southern Siberia. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA, 117 (6), 2879-2885.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85079330703

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2151&context=smhpapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/1137

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 2879

End Page


  • 2885

Volume


  • 117

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States