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Sedentary Time and Physical Activity Associations Between Child Care Educators and Children

Journal Article


Abstract


  • © 2020 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Introduction: This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity among child care educators and children in their direct care and aims to determine if the associations differed between toddlers (aged 19–35 months) and preschoolers (aged 36–60 months). Methods: The participants were educators and children from 19 child care centers in Edmonton and Ottawa, Canada, as part of the Supporting Healthy Active Child Care Settings study. Sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity during child care were measured with accelerometers in 2017–2018. Nap time data were removed for children and educators based on room schedules. Children were matched with the main educator in their room that had the highest total physical activity, resulting in 187 children and 38 educators. Multilevel linear regression models with interaction terms were conducted in 2019. Results: Children engaged in 30.0, 23.1, and 6.9 minutes per hour of sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity, respectively. Educators engaged in 33.5, 23.6, and 2.9 minutes per hour of sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity, respectively. No significant interactions were observed, so age-stratified analyses were not conducted. Each additional 5 minutes per hour of educator sedentary time was significantly associated with 0.5 minutes per hour lower child moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity. Each additional 5 minutes per hour of educator moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity was significantly associated with 1.3 minutes per hour higher child moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity. No other significant observations were observed. Conclusions: The educators’ sedentary time and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity may have a small but potentially meaningful influence on children's moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity because educators directly care for multiple children. Targeting these educator behaviors may be one strategy to increase children's moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity during child care.

Authors


  •   Carson, Valerie (external author)
  •   Adamo, Kristi (external author)
  •   Ogden, Nancy (external author)
  •   Goldfield, Gary (external author)
  •   Okely, Anthony D.
  •   Kuzik, Nicholas (external author)
  •   Crozier, Mitchell (external author)
  •   Hunter, Stephen (external author)
  •   Predy, Madison (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Carson, V., Adamo, K., Ogden, N., Goldfield, G., Okely, A., Kuzik, N., Crozier, M., Hunter, S. & Predy, M. (2020). Sedentary Time and Physical Activity Associations Between Child Care Educators and Children. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85078528265

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • © 2020 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Introduction: This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary time and physical activity among child care educators and children in their direct care and aims to determine if the associations differed between toddlers (aged 19–35 months) and preschoolers (aged 36–60 months). Methods: The participants were educators and children from 19 child care centers in Edmonton and Ottawa, Canada, as part of the Supporting Healthy Active Child Care Settings study. Sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity during child care were measured with accelerometers in 2017–2018. Nap time data were removed for children and educators based on room schedules. Children were matched with the main educator in their room that had the highest total physical activity, resulting in 187 children and 38 educators. Multilevel linear regression models with interaction terms were conducted in 2019. Results: Children engaged in 30.0, 23.1, and 6.9 minutes per hour of sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity, respectively. Educators engaged in 33.5, 23.6, and 2.9 minutes per hour of sedentary time, light-intensity physical activity, and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity, respectively. No significant interactions were observed, so age-stratified analyses were not conducted. Each additional 5 minutes per hour of educator sedentary time was significantly associated with 0.5 minutes per hour lower child moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity. Each additional 5 minutes per hour of educator moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity was significantly associated with 1.3 minutes per hour higher child moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity. No other significant observations were observed. Conclusions: The educators’ sedentary time and moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity may have a small but potentially meaningful influence on children's moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity because educators directly care for multiple children. Targeting these educator behaviors may be one strategy to increase children's moderate to vigorous–intensity physical activity during child care.

Authors


  •   Carson, Valerie (external author)
  •   Adamo, Kristi (external author)
  •   Ogden, Nancy (external author)
  •   Goldfield, Gary (external author)
  •   Okely, Anthony D.
  •   Kuzik, Nicholas (external author)
  •   Crozier, Mitchell (external author)
  •   Hunter, Stephen (external author)
  •   Predy, Madison (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Carson, V., Adamo, K., Ogden, N., Goldfield, G., Okely, A., Kuzik, N., Crozier, M., Hunter, S. & Predy, M. (2020). Sedentary Time and Physical Activity Associations Between Child Care Educators and Children. American Journal of Preventive Medicine,

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85078528265

Place Of Publication


  • United States