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Pressure Injury Prevalence and Practice Improvement: A realist evaluation of nursing care and nursing knowledge to reduce pressure injuries in an Australian hospital

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Background: Pressure Injuries place

    a significant burden on the health

    care system and cause patient harm.

    Hospital acquired pressure injuries

    (HAPI) can be prevented by high

    quality nursing interventions.

    Aim: To explore how periodic pressure

    injury prevalence (PIP) surveys

    can impact on HAPI rates and the

    knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff

    towards preventing pressure injuries in

    an acute care hospital.

    Methods: A concurrent, two phase,

    case study design was used to assess

    PIP and the knowledge and attitudes

    of nursing staff towards preventing

    pressure injuries in 4 wards at a large

    teaching hospital in NSW, Australia.

    Data was collected from July 2018 to

    February 2019. The PIP survey also

    collected data on nursing care processes

    to assess risk and plan interventions.

    Multiple action learning sets were

    then used for staff to identify areas

    of improvement and make changes.

    PIP and the knowledge and attitudes

    of nursing staff towards preventing

    pressure injuries were then remeasured

    at the end of the project.

    Results: The rate of HAPI prevalence

    decreased from 4.6% to 1.9% during

    the project. Nurses’ initial knowledge

    and attitudes towards prevention of

    pressure injuries revealed a strong

    knowledge on risk assessment (82.6%)

    and poor knowledge on prevention

    (31.1%). Nurses’ knowledge on most themes of the Pressure Injury

    Prevention Knowledge Assessment

    Tool (PUKAT 2.0) increased during the

    project.

    Discussion: Four wards participated

    in this study. Some wards engaged with

    the action learning sets and used Plan-

    Do-Study-Act cycles to improve nursing

    care processes and nursing knowledge

    during this project. Wards with higher

    levels of engagement improved patient

    outcomes by reducing pressure injuries

    and increased nursing knowledge.

    Conclusion: Pressure injuries are

    preventable. Nurses’ knowledge

    and attitudes towards prevention in

    combination with valid and reliable

    data can assist nurses working in acute

    care hospitals to prevent pressure

    injuries.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Sim, J., Wilson, V. & Tuqiri, K. (2019). Pressure Injury Prevalence and Practice Improvement: A realist evaluation of nursing care and nursing knowledge to reduce pressure injuries in an Australian hospital. RCN International Nursing Research Conference and Exhibition

Abstract


  • Background: Pressure Injuries place

    a significant burden on the health

    care system and cause patient harm.

    Hospital acquired pressure injuries

    (HAPI) can be prevented by high

    quality nursing interventions.

    Aim: To explore how periodic pressure

    injury prevalence (PIP) surveys

    can impact on HAPI rates and the

    knowledge and attitudes of nursing staff

    towards preventing pressure injuries in

    an acute care hospital.

    Methods: A concurrent, two phase,

    case study design was used to assess

    PIP and the knowledge and attitudes

    of nursing staff towards preventing

    pressure injuries in 4 wards at a large

    teaching hospital in NSW, Australia.

    Data was collected from July 2018 to

    February 2019. The PIP survey also

    collected data on nursing care processes

    to assess risk and plan interventions.

    Multiple action learning sets were

    then used for staff to identify areas

    of improvement and make changes.

    PIP and the knowledge and attitudes

    of nursing staff towards preventing

    pressure injuries were then remeasured

    at the end of the project.

    Results: The rate of HAPI prevalence

    decreased from 4.6% to 1.9% during

    the project. Nurses’ initial knowledge

    and attitudes towards prevention of

    pressure injuries revealed a strong

    knowledge on risk assessment (82.6%)

    and poor knowledge on prevention

    (31.1%). Nurses’ knowledge on most themes of the Pressure Injury

    Prevention Knowledge Assessment

    Tool (PUKAT 2.0) increased during the

    project.

    Discussion: Four wards participated

    in this study. Some wards engaged with

    the action learning sets and used Plan-

    Do-Study-Act cycles to improve nursing

    care processes and nursing knowledge

    during this project. Wards with higher

    levels of engagement improved patient

    outcomes by reducing pressure injuries

    and increased nursing knowledge.

    Conclusion: Pressure injuries are

    preventable. Nurses’ knowledge

    and attitudes towards prevention in

    combination with valid and reliable

    data can assist nurses working in acute

    care hospitals to prevent pressure

    injuries.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Sim, J., Wilson, V. & Tuqiri, K. (2019). Pressure Injury Prevalence and Practice Improvement: A realist evaluation of nursing care and nursing knowledge to reduce pressure injuries in an Australian hospital. RCN International Nursing Research Conference and Exhibition