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How can a measure improve assessment and management of symptoms and concerns for people with dementia in care homes? A mixed-methods feasibility and process evaluation of ipos-dem

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background Assessment of people with dementia is challenging; with undetected and under treated symptoms and concerns resulting in avoidable distress, and few evidence-based interventions to support this. We aimed to understand the mechanisms of action of a measure to support comprehensive assessment of people with dementia in care homes; and its acceptability, feasibility, and implementation requirements.

    Methods A qualitative study with an embedded quantitative component in three residential care homes, underpinned by an initial theoretical model of mechanisms of action. The measure, the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale for Dementia (IPOS-Dem), was introduced into the care of residents with dementia for 12 weeks. Qualitative data comprised focus groups and semi-structured interviews with family, care home staff, general practitioners and district nurses; and non-participant observations. Quantitative data comprised IPOS-Dem data. Directed content analysis for qualitative data, and descriptive statistics were used for quantitative data.

    Findings Key mechanisms of action were: improved observation and awareness of residents, collaborative assessment, comprehensive ‘picture of the person’, systematic record keeping, improved review and monitoring, care planning and changes to care provision, and facilitated multi-agency communication. Potential benefit included improved symptom management, improved comprehensive care, and increased family empowerment and engagement. IPOS-Dem was found to be acceptable and feasible. It was perceived as quick and easy to use, with proportion of overall missing data decreasing from 2.1% to 1.1% from baseline to final time points. ‘Trust’ in the measure was important; and leadership essential to ensure integration into care processes.

    Conclusions In a population with complex care needs, with challenges to assessment and barriers to multi-agency working, a measure introduced into routine care is feasible and acceptable, and supports assessment and management of symptoms and concerns. A refined theoretical model demonstrating the likely mechanisms of action was developed. Further evaluation is required to test its effectiveness.

UOW Authors


  •   Ellis-Smith, Clare (external author)
  •   Higginson, Irene (external author)
  •   Daveson, Barbara
  •   Henson, Lesley (external author)
  •   Evans, Catherine (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • C. Ellis-Smith, I. J. Higginson, B. A. Daveson, L. A. Henson & C. J. Evans, "How can a measure improve assessment and management of symptoms and concerns for people with dementia in care homes? A mixed-methods feasibility and process evaluation of ipos-dem", PLoS One 13 7 (2018) e0200240-1-e0200240-29.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85049695472

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e0200240-1

End Page


  • e0200240-29

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Background Assessment of people with dementia is challenging; with undetected and under treated symptoms and concerns resulting in avoidable distress, and few evidence-based interventions to support this. We aimed to understand the mechanisms of action of a measure to support comprehensive assessment of people with dementia in care homes; and its acceptability, feasibility, and implementation requirements.

    Methods A qualitative study with an embedded quantitative component in three residential care homes, underpinned by an initial theoretical model of mechanisms of action. The measure, the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale for Dementia (IPOS-Dem), was introduced into the care of residents with dementia for 12 weeks. Qualitative data comprised focus groups and semi-structured interviews with family, care home staff, general practitioners and district nurses; and non-participant observations. Quantitative data comprised IPOS-Dem data. Directed content analysis for qualitative data, and descriptive statistics were used for quantitative data.

    Findings Key mechanisms of action were: improved observation and awareness of residents, collaborative assessment, comprehensive ‘picture of the person’, systematic record keeping, improved review and monitoring, care planning and changes to care provision, and facilitated multi-agency communication. Potential benefit included improved symptom management, improved comprehensive care, and increased family empowerment and engagement. IPOS-Dem was found to be acceptable and feasible. It was perceived as quick and easy to use, with proportion of overall missing data decreasing from 2.1% to 1.1% from baseline to final time points. ‘Trust’ in the measure was important; and leadership essential to ensure integration into care processes.

    Conclusions In a population with complex care needs, with challenges to assessment and barriers to multi-agency working, a measure introduced into routine care is feasible and acceptable, and supports assessment and management of symptoms and concerns. A refined theoretical model demonstrating the likely mechanisms of action was developed. Further evaluation is required to test its effectiveness.

UOW Authors


  •   Ellis-Smith, Clare (external author)
  •   Higginson, Irene (external author)
  •   Daveson, Barbara
  •   Henson, Lesley (external author)
  •   Evans, Catherine (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • C. Ellis-Smith, I. J. Higginson, B. A. Daveson, L. A. Henson & C. J. Evans, "How can a measure improve assessment and management of symptoms and concerns for people with dementia in care homes? A mixed-methods feasibility and process evaluation of ipos-dem", PLoS One 13 7 (2018) e0200240-1-e0200240-29.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85049695472

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e0200240-1

End Page


  • e0200240-29

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 7

Place Of Publication


  • United States