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Perceived Scene Stability Predicts Presence and Cybersickness

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Cybersickness is the adverse experience of oculomotor discomfort, disorientation or nausea

    commonly reported by users of head-mounted displays (HMDs). We instructed participants to

    generate pitch head movements in response to a metronome at either 0.5 Hz or 1.0 Hz. We

    systematically increased the display lag of the Oculus Rift CV1 above its benchmark latency

    (<9ms). We found that increasing display lag increased perceived scene instability, and this perceived

    scene instability increased with the speed of head movement. Participants who reported

    greater perceived scene instability also reported weaker spatial presence (i.e., the illusory experience

    of being “there” in the virtual environment). Severity of cybersickness was also predicted

    by the magnitude of perceived scene instability. These findings suggest that the human visual

    system’s sensitivity to display lag depends on perceived scene instability, which in turn depends

    on the speed of head movement.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Kim, J. & Palmisano, S. (2019). Perceived Scene Stability Predicts Presence and Cybersickness. i-Perception, 10 86-87.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 86

End Page


  • 87

Volume


  • 10

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Cybersickness is the adverse experience of oculomotor discomfort, disorientation or nausea

    commonly reported by users of head-mounted displays (HMDs). We instructed participants to

    generate pitch head movements in response to a metronome at either 0.5 Hz or 1.0 Hz. We

    systematically increased the display lag of the Oculus Rift CV1 above its benchmark latency

    (<9ms). We found that increasing display lag increased perceived scene instability, and this perceived

    scene instability increased with the speed of head movement. Participants who reported

    greater perceived scene instability also reported weaker spatial presence (i.e., the illusory experience

    of being “there” in the virtual environment). Severity of cybersickness was also predicted

    by the magnitude of perceived scene instability. These findings suggest that the human visual

    system’s sensitivity to display lag depends on perceived scene instability, which in turn depends

    on the speed of head movement.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Kim, J. & Palmisano, S. (2019). Perceived Scene Stability Predicts Presence and Cybersickness. i-Perception, 10 86-87.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 86

End Page


  • 87

Volume


  • 10

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom