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Introduction

Chapter


Abstract


  • Energy and environment are two foremost areas of global crisis. The

    world’s energy demand is growing remarkably which is not only diminishing the

    reserve of fossil fuels, but also affecting the environment. In 2014, the global

    primary energy consumption was 12,928.4 million tons of oil equivalent (MTOE)

    which generates about 10,000 million tons of carbon during the burning of fossil

    fuels. It is more and more broadly recognized that renewable energy, especially

    solar energy, can offer effective solutions to these gigantic challenges. Now,

    renewable energy contributes around 3 % of the world’s energy needs. By the end

    of 2014, a total of 187.24 GW solar photovoltaic (PV) power capacity had been

    installed in the world. The annual installation of new PV systems rose from

    47.60 GW in 2014 to 58.10 GW in 2015, and in 2010, it was only 17.06 GW. Up

    to 2014, about 1600 installations worldwide were PV power plants larger than

    4 MW. Of which 60 plants in Spain and 50 in Germany generating an output of

    more than 10 MW. A 10 MW solar PV power plant may save about 15,000 tons of

    CO2 emissions per annum. In order to push this emerging technology, more

    research is needed. The book provides a consistent compilation of fundamental

    theories, a compendium of current research and development activities in the field

    of solar PV technologies. In this chapter, the development of solar PV technologies

    is presented in the Preface section. This introductory chapter also presents the

    objectives and the organization of the whole book.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • M. Islam, "Introduction," in Advances in Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants, M. Islam, F. Rahman & W. Xu, Eds. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2016, pp.1-11.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783662505212

Book Title


  • Advances in Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11

Place Of Publication


  • Berlin Heidelberg

Abstract


  • Energy and environment are two foremost areas of global crisis. The

    world’s energy demand is growing remarkably which is not only diminishing the

    reserve of fossil fuels, but also affecting the environment. In 2014, the global

    primary energy consumption was 12,928.4 million tons of oil equivalent (MTOE)

    which generates about 10,000 million tons of carbon during the burning of fossil

    fuels. It is more and more broadly recognized that renewable energy, especially

    solar energy, can offer effective solutions to these gigantic challenges. Now,

    renewable energy contributes around 3 % of the world’s energy needs. By the end

    of 2014, a total of 187.24 GW solar photovoltaic (PV) power capacity had been

    installed in the world. The annual installation of new PV systems rose from

    47.60 GW in 2014 to 58.10 GW in 2015, and in 2010, it was only 17.06 GW. Up

    to 2014, about 1600 installations worldwide were PV power plants larger than

    4 MW. Of which 60 plants in Spain and 50 in Germany generating an output of

    more than 10 MW. A 10 MW solar PV power plant may save about 15,000 tons of

    CO2 emissions per annum. In order to push this emerging technology, more

    research is needed. The book provides a consistent compilation of fundamental

    theories, a compendium of current research and development activities in the field

    of solar PV technologies. In this chapter, the development of solar PV technologies

    is presented in the Preface section. This introductory chapter also presents the

    objectives and the organization of the whole book.

Publication Date


  • 2016

Citation


  • M. Islam, "Introduction," in Advances in Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants, M. Islam, F. Rahman & W. Xu, Eds. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2016, pp.1-11.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783662505212

Book Title


  • Advances in Solar Photovoltaic Power Plants

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11

Place Of Publication


  • Berlin Heidelberg