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Conflicting World Views: Disjuncture between Climate Change Knowledge, Land Use Planning and Disaster Resilience in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northern Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This paper examines the links between emergency management and land use planning

    in four remote Indigenous communities in tropical northern Australia and

    the extent to which such linkages produced better disaster resilience in these communities.

    The case study communities were chosen because they are in locations

    likely to experience increased frequency and/or intensity of extreme weather events,

    both slow (sea level rise, drought) and rapid onset (storm surges, cyclones, floods)

    as a consequence of climate change. We compared land use planning legislation,

    state level planning policies, statutory planning schemes, property registration systems

    and emergency management systems. We found a clear disjuncture between

    understanding the likely impacts of climate change and the collection of emergency

    management data and the consideration of hazards and risks in land use planning

    systems. We conclude that the land use planning systems in tropical northern Australia

    are still geared toward promoting and facilitating development and have

    not evolved sufficiently to take account of climate change impacts, including sea

    level rise. This disjuncture is particularly evident in the context of remote Indigenous

    communities in Australia and reforms to land use planning systems are

    urgently required to address this disjuncture.

UOW Authors


  •   Wensing, Ed (external author)
  •   Harwood, Sharon (external author)
  •   Bird, Deanne (external author)
  •   Haynes, Kat A.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Wensing, E., Harwood, S., Bird, D. & Haynes, K. (2014). Conflicting World Views: Disjuncture between Climate Change Knowledge, Land Use Planning and Disaster Resilience in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northern Australia. Geography Research Forum, 34 92-107.

Number Of Pages


  • 15

Start Page


  • 92

End Page


  • 107

Volume


  • 34

Place Of Publication


  • Israel

Abstract


  • This paper examines the links between emergency management and land use planning

    in four remote Indigenous communities in tropical northern Australia and

    the extent to which such linkages produced better disaster resilience in these communities.

    The case study communities were chosen because they are in locations

    likely to experience increased frequency and/or intensity of extreme weather events,

    both slow (sea level rise, drought) and rapid onset (storm surges, cyclones, floods)

    as a consequence of climate change. We compared land use planning legislation,

    state level planning policies, statutory planning schemes, property registration systems

    and emergency management systems. We found a clear disjuncture between

    understanding the likely impacts of climate change and the collection of emergency

    management data and the consideration of hazards and risks in land use planning

    systems. We conclude that the land use planning systems in tropical northern Australia

    are still geared toward promoting and facilitating development and have

    not evolved sufficiently to take account of climate change impacts, including sea

    level rise. This disjuncture is particularly evident in the context of remote Indigenous

    communities in Australia and reforms to land use planning systems are

    urgently required to address this disjuncture.

UOW Authors


  •   Wensing, Ed (external author)
  •   Harwood, Sharon (external author)
  •   Bird, Deanne (external author)
  •   Haynes, Kat A.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Wensing, E., Harwood, S., Bird, D. & Haynes, K. (2014). Conflicting World Views: Disjuncture between Climate Change Knowledge, Land Use Planning and Disaster Resilience in Remote Indigenous Communities in Northern Australia. Geography Research Forum, 34 92-107.

Number Of Pages


  • 15

Start Page


  • 92

End Page


  • 107

Volume


  • 34

Place Of Publication


  • Israel