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Sink or swim? Response, recovery and adaptation in communities impacted by the 2010/11 Australian floods

Chapter


Abstract


  • The Queensland (northeast Australia) wet season and Victorian (southeast Australia) summer of 2010/11 were record-breaking periods. Based on climate models, the IPCC (2012) argues with medium confidence that anthropogenic influence has contributed to rainfall extremes. The research applied a mixed methods approach whereby different qualitative (face-to-face interviews, open response questions within questionnaires) and quantitative (closed questions within questionnaires) methods contributed to different aspects of the study. Many respondents (43%) were living in a singlestorey house (i.e. not raised on stumps or stilts), a single-storey duplex or a ground floor unit. As many Australian disasters occur during the summer when people are on holiday or absent from the community, a network of contacts would be extremely useful.

UOW Authors


  •   Bird, Deanne (external author)
  •   King, David (external author)
  •   Haynes, Kat A.
  •   Box, Pamela (external author)
  •   Okada, Tetsuya (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Bird, D. K., King, D., Haynes, K., Box, P. & Okada, T. (2015). Sink or swim? Response, recovery and adaptation in communities impacted by the 2010/11 Australian floods. In J. Palutikof, S. L. Boulter, J. Barnett & D. Rissik (Eds.), Applied Studies in Climate Adaptation (pp. 395-406). Chichester, United Kingdom: Wiley Blackwell. 2014

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781118845011

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84927794480

Book Title


  • Applied Studies in Climate Adaptation

Start Page


  • 395

End Page


  • 406

Place Of Publication


  • Chichester, United Kingdom

Abstract


  • The Queensland (northeast Australia) wet season and Victorian (southeast Australia) summer of 2010/11 were record-breaking periods. Based on climate models, the IPCC (2012) argues with medium confidence that anthropogenic influence has contributed to rainfall extremes. The research applied a mixed methods approach whereby different qualitative (face-to-face interviews, open response questions within questionnaires) and quantitative (closed questions within questionnaires) methods contributed to different aspects of the study. Many respondents (43%) were living in a singlestorey house (i.e. not raised on stumps or stilts), a single-storey duplex or a ground floor unit. As many Australian disasters occur during the summer when people are on holiday or absent from the community, a network of contacts would be extremely useful.

UOW Authors


  •   Bird, Deanne (external author)
  •   King, David (external author)
  •   Haynes, Kat A.
  •   Box, Pamela (external author)
  •   Okada, Tetsuya (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Bird, D. K., King, D., Haynes, K., Box, P. & Okada, T. (2015). Sink or swim? Response, recovery and adaptation in communities impacted by the 2010/11 Australian floods. In J. Palutikof, S. L. Boulter, J. Barnett & D. Rissik (Eds.), Applied Studies in Climate Adaptation (pp. 395-406). Chichester, United Kingdom: Wiley Blackwell. 2014

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781118845011

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84927794480

Book Title


  • Applied Studies in Climate Adaptation

Start Page


  • 395

End Page


  • 406

Place Of Publication


  • Chichester, United Kingdom