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What prevents patients sleeping on an acute medical ward? An actigraphy and qualitative sleep study

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: Poor and fragmented sleep is a common problem amongst patients hospitalized on medical wards, and is associated with a number of poor outcomes. The present study aimed to objectively measure night-time sleep duration and efficiency in an acute medical ward, and to identify barriers to sleep in this setting. Methods: Fifty-four consecutive patients on an acute medical ward were observed with wearable actigraphy devices for one night, then administered the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and a semi-qualitative questionnaire to determine the major barriers to sleep. Results: Patients had a wide variety of reasons for admission. Mean overnight sleep duration was 4.6 hours, with mean sleep efficiency 63%. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire mean was 52/100, indicating poor quality sleep. Major barriers to sleep identified were the need to urinate, pain, noise, and light. Conclusions: A mixture of environmental and illness-related factors contribute to poor sleep in the hospital setting. Further research looking at ameliorating these factors may improve sleep and recovery in this population.

Authors


  •   Macfarlane, Matthew D. (external author)
  •   Rajapakse, Shammi (external author)
  •   Loughran, Sarah P. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Macfarlane, M., Rajapakse, S. & Loughran, S. (2019). What prevents patients sleeping on an acute medical ward? An actigraphy and qualitative sleep study. Sleep Health, 5 (6), 666-669.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85070358770

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/1471

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 666

End Page


  • 669

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Objectives: Poor and fragmented sleep is a common problem amongst patients hospitalized on medical wards, and is associated with a number of poor outcomes. The present study aimed to objectively measure night-time sleep duration and efficiency in an acute medical ward, and to identify barriers to sleep in this setting. Methods: Fifty-four consecutive patients on an acute medical ward were observed with wearable actigraphy devices for one night, then administered the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and a semi-qualitative questionnaire to determine the major barriers to sleep. Results: Patients had a wide variety of reasons for admission. Mean overnight sleep duration was 4.6 hours, with mean sleep efficiency 63%. The Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire mean was 52/100, indicating poor quality sleep. Major barriers to sleep identified were the need to urinate, pain, noise, and light. Conclusions: A mixture of environmental and illness-related factors contribute to poor sleep in the hospital setting. Further research looking at ameliorating these factors may improve sleep and recovery in this population.

Authors


  •   Macfarlane, Matthew D. (external author)
  •   Rajapakse, Shammi (external author)
  •   Loughran, Sarah P. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Macfarlane, M., Rajapakse, S. & Loughran, S. (2019). What prevents patients sleeping on an acute medical ward? An actigraphy and qualitative sleep study. Sleep Health, 5 (6), 666-669.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85070358770

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ihmri/1471

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 666

End Page


  • 669

Volume


  • 5

Issue


  • 6

Place Of Publication


  • United States