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Heart of Artness: Episode Art with Heart, a Two-Ways World




Type Of Work


  • Audio-Visual Recording / Broadcast

Abstract


  • This work examines and documents the crosscultural relationships that underpin the production of contemporary Aboriginal art at the Buku-Larrnggay Mulka art centre, in the remote Yolngu community of Yirrkala, 600 kilometres south of Darwin, NT. It is underpinned by field work funded by the Australian Research Council (DP150103082), which allowed Siobhan McHugh to make two trips to Yirrkala, in 2015 and 2016, along with lead CI Prof Ian McLean and PI Margo Neale. On these trips, she recorded oral histories with Yolngu artists Garawan Wanambi, Gunybi Ganambarr, Yinimala Gumana and others, and with the long-standing art centre manager Will Stubbs.

    The research design deliberately focused on orality (spoken word) and aurality (actuality and soundscape), in order to capture and showcase Indigenous knowledge about Aboriginal art – which is usually framed by non-Indigenous art historians and curators. The oral histories, which put Indigenous voices literally as the focus of the research, were conducted according to best ethical principles of oral history as a concept and a methodology. They are collaborative, long-form and facilitatory, and a copy is preserved as a scholarly resource for other researchers, with access conditions set by the interviewee. Negotiations are underway to have this oral history collection archived at the National Library of Australia.

    The non-invasive nature of audio recording and absence of visual judgement promotes particularly frank and open revelations by interviewees in the oral histories. Two artists sit by a riverbank and describe a massacre there of their forebears in 1911. They also reflect on how their art communicates their knowledge and belief systems. These recordings were then creatively mined and interpreted by McHugh and woven along with other aural elements she recorded, such as birdsong and ambient river sounds, sounds of stripping bark for a canvas, daily life in Yirrkala, into a powerfully affective, crafted artefact, with an expository script narrated by McHugh. The key contributors were given a copy of the artefact ahead of broadcast, to ensure cultural integrity had not been breached and that the work did not misrepresent those interviewed.

    The completed artefact represents a new synthesis of knowledge that showcases the project’s original research into crosscultural influences on Aboriginal art as a 41-minute rendered audio recording, called Art with Heart: A Two Ways World, Episode Two of a podcast series called Heart of Artness.

    It was published online by Apple iTunes on 4 September 2018 as the Heart of Artness podcast and later by Google Podcasts. It is also published on the podcast website, artess.net.au. This episode won a gold award at the New York Radio Festival, 2019, in the Culture and Arts category.

    https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • McHugh, S., McLean, I. A., Neale, M., Freer, G.. et al Heart of Artness: Episode Art with Heart, a Two-Ways World. Audio-visual recordingWeb. Wollongong: University of Wollongong, 2018. https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA 2018

Distribution Medium


  • Web

Url


  • https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA

Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong

Type Of Work


  • Audio-Visual Recording / Broadcast

Abstract


  • This work examines and documents the crosscultural relationships that underpin the production of contemporary Aboriginal art at the Buku-Larrnggay Mulka art centre, in the remote Yolngu community of Yirrkala, 600 kilometres south of Darwin, NT. It is underpinned by field work funded by the Australian Research Council (DP150103082), which allowed Siobhan McHugh to make two trips to Yirrkala, in 2015 and 2016, along with lead CI Prof Ian McLean and PI Margo Neale. On these trips, she recorded oral histories with Yolngu artists Garawan Wanambi, Gunybi Ganambarr, Yinimala Gumana and others, and with the long-standing art centre manager Will Stubbs.

    The research design deliberately focused on orality (spoken word) and aurality (actuality and soundscape), in order to capture and showcase Indigenous knowledge about Aboriginal art – which is usually framed by non-Indigenous art historians and curators. The oral histories, which put Indigenous voices literally as the focus of the research, were conducted according to best ethical principles of oral history as a concept and a methodology. They are collaborative, long-form and facilitatory, and a copy is preserved as a scholarly resource for other researchers, with access conditions set by the interviewee. Negotiations are underway to have this oral history collection archived at the National Library of Australia.

    The non-invasive nature of audio recording and absence of visual judgement promotes particularly frank and open revelations by interviewees in the oral histories. Two artists sit by a riverbank and describe a massacre there of their forebears in 1911. They also reflect on how their art communicates their knowledge and belief systems. These recordings were then creatively mined and interpreted by McHugh and woven along with other aural elements she recorded, such as birdsong and ambient river sounds, sounds of stripping bark for a canvas, daily life in Yirrkala, into a powerfully affective, crafted artefact, with an expository script narrated by McHugh. The key contributors were given a copy of the artefact ahead of broadcast, to ensure cultural integrity had not been breached and that the work did not misrepresent those interviewed.

    The completed artefact represents a new synthesis of knowledge that showcases the project’s original research into crosscultural influences on Aboriginal art as a 41-minute rendered audio recording, called Art with Heart: A Two Ways World, Episode Two of a podcast series called Heart of Artness.

    It was published online by Apple iTunes on 4 September 2018 as the Heart of Artness podcast and later by Google Podcasts. It is also published on the podcast website, artess.net.au. This episode won a gold award at the New York Radio Festival, 2019, in the Culture and Arts category.

    https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • McHugh, S., McLean, I. A., Neale, M., Freer, G.. et al Heart of Artness: Episode Art with Heart, a Two-Ways World. Audio-visual recordingWeb. Wollongong: University of Wollongong, 2018. https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA 2018

Distribution Medium


  • Web

Url


  • https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/ep-2-art-with-heart-a-two-ways-world/id1385361732?i=1000419061373&fbclid=IwAR1OaO6TJesrRZ6BEg81vohYvm_bmZ7PQL_vR3p-yUIeSdxAhj0A3l6BQxA

Place Of Publication


  • Wollongong