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Residential self-selection, perceived built environment and type 2 diabetes incidence: A longitudinal analysis of 36,224 middle to older age adults

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Much of the existing studies on the built environment and type 2 diabetes are cross-sectional and prone to residential self-selection bias. Using multilevel logistic regression analysis of 36,224 participants from a longitudinal study, we examined whether perceived built environment characteristics are associated with type 2 diabetes. We found that the odds of diabetes incidence varied geographically. Those who reported that there were no local amenities and reported day- and night-time crime rates made walking unsafe in the neighbourhood had higher odds of developing incident type 2 diabetes. These associations persisted after accounting for some predictors of residential self-selection. More longitudinal studies are needed to corroborate the findings. Changing the features of the residential built environment may be an important point of intervention for type 2 diabetes prevention.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Dendup, T., Astell-Burt, T. & Feng, X. (2019). Residential self-selection, perceived built environment and type 2 diabetes incidence: A longitudinal analysis of 36,224 middle to older age adults. Health and Place, 58 102154-1-102154-10.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85067577726

Start Page


  • 102154-1

End Page


  • 102154-10

Volume


  • 58

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Much of the existing studies on the built environment and type 2 diabetes are cross-sectional and prone to residential self-selection bias. Using multilevel logistic regression analysis of 36,224 participants from a longitudinal study, we examined whether perceived built environment characteristics are associated with type 2 diabetes. We found that the odds of diabetes incidence varied geographically. Those who reported that there were no local amenities and reported day- and night-time crime rates made walking unsafe in the neighbourhood had higher odds of developing incident type 2 diabetes. These associations persisted after accounting for some predictors of residential self-selection. More longitudinal studies are needed to corroborate the findings. Changing the features of the residential built environment may be an important point of intervention for type 2 diabetes prevention.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Dendup, T., Astell-Burt, T. & Feng, X. (2019). Residential self-selection, perceived built environment and type 2 diabetes incidence: A longitudinal analysis of 36,224 middle to older age adults. Health and Place, 58 102154-1-102154-10.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85067577726

Start Page


  • 102154-1

End Page


  • 102154-10

Volume


  • 58

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom