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Whitmore Tension Section and Block Shear

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This paper examines the validity of the Whitmore net section tension capacity for the design of bolted gusset plates. Using simple

    algebra, this paper first shows that the Whitmore criterion and the correct block shear criterion would give similar results for a standard

    connection having approximately seven rows of bolts. It then shows that the Whitmore criterion severely underestimates the actual capacities

    of connections having two or three bolt rows tested by independent researchers. Conversely, it also shows that the same criterion overestimates

    the capacities of connections having nine bolt rows that were believed by the testing researchers to fail in the Whitmore section. Using

    finite-element analysis incorporating fracture simulation, this paper shows that the apparent Whitmore tensile fractures only took place

    because the tests were continued long after the ultimate limit state of block shear. This paper proposes that the Whitmore section

    check be made redundant in light of the block shear check, which accurately predicted the ultimate test loads of all the specimens.

Authors


  •   Elliott, Matthew (external author)
  •   Teh, Lip H.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Elliott, M. & Teh, L. H. (2019). Whitmore Tension Section and Block Shear. Journal of Structural Engineering, 145 (2), 04018250-1-04018250-10.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057606113

Start Page


  • 04018250-1

End Page


  • 04018250-10

Volume


  • 145

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • This paper examines the validity of the Whitmore net section tension capacity for the design of bolted gusset plates. Using simple

    algebra, this paper first shows that the Whitmore criterion and the correct block shear criterion would give similar results for a standard

    connection having approximately seven rows of bolts. It then shows that the Whitmore criterion severely underestimates the actual capacities

    of connections having two or three bolt rows tested by independent researchers. Conversely, it also shows that the same criterion overestimates

    the capacities of connections having nine bolt rows that were believed by the testing researchers to fail in the Whitmore section. Using

    finite-element analysis incorporating fracture simulation, this paper shows that the apparent Whitmore tensile fractures only took place

    because the tests were continued long after the ultimate limit state of block shear. This paper proposes that the Whitmore section

    check be made redundant in light of the block shear check, which accurately predicted the ultimate test loads of all the specimens.

Authors


  •   Elliott, Matthew (external author)
  •   Teh, Lip H.

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • Elliott, M. & Teh, L. H. (2019). Whitmore Tension Section and Block Shear. Journal of Structural Engineering, 145 (2), 04018250-1-04018250-10.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057606113

Start Page


  • 04018250-1

End Page


  • 04018250-10

Volume


  • 145

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


  • United States