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Being ourselves, naming ourselves, writing ourselves: Indigenous Australian women disrupting what it is to be academic within the academy

Chapter


Abstract


  • This chapter shares the experience of a group of Indigenous women with academic writing. In our stories, we discuss the professional and personal challenges we face as Indigenous people, as women and as academics, and most specifically as academic writers. Paramount is the difficulty of being in institutions that do not value our cultural knowledges, our ways of being, and our specific expertise. In its institutional form, the university remains largely assimilationist that denies other ways of thinking, being and writing. For us, our writing is about being resistant to that assimilation, and provides an avenue to have our voices heard, while staying strong and true to our Indigenous cultures and heritage.

Authors


  •   Fredericks, Bronwyn (external author)
  •   White, Nereda (external author)
  •   Phillips, Sandra (external author)
  •   Bunda, Tracey (external author)
  •   Longbottom, Marlene A.
  •   Bargallie, Debbie (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • B. Fredericks, N. White, S. Phillips, T. Bunda, M. Longbottom & D. Bargallie, "Being ourselves, naming ourselves, writing ourselves: Indigenous Australian women disrupting what it is to be academic within the academy", in Academic writing and identity constructions: Performativity, space and territory in academic workplaces (eds A. B. Reinersten & L. M. Thomas), (Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland, 2019) 75-96.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783030016739

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ahsri/965

Book Title


  • Academic writing and identity constructions: Performativity, space and territory in academic workplaces

Start Page


  • 75

End Page


  • 96

Place Of Publication


  • Cham, Switzerland

Abstract


  • This chapter shares the experience of a group of Indigenous women with academic writing. In our stories, we discuss the professional and personal challenges we face as Indigenous people, as women and as academics, and most specifically as academic writers. Paramount is the difficulty of being in institutions that do not value our cultural knowledges, our ways of being, and our specific expertise. In its institutional form, the university remains largely assimilationist that denies other ways of thinking, being and writing. For us, our writing is about being resistant to that assimilation, and provides an avenue to have our voices heard, while staying strong and true to our Indigenous cultures and heritage.

Authors


  •   Fredericks, Bronwyn (external author)
  •   White, Nereda (external author)
  •   Phillips, Sandra (external author)
  •   Bunda, Tracey (external author)
  •   Longbottom, Marlene A.
  •   Bargallie, Debbie (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • B. Fredericks, N. White, S. Phillips, T. Bunda, M. Longbottom & D. Bargallie, "Being ourselves, naming ourselves, writing ourselves: Indigenous Australian women disrupting what it is to be academic within the academy", in Academic writing and identity constructions: Performativity, space and territory in academic workplaces (eds A. B. Reinersten & L. M. Thomas), (Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland, 2019) 75-96.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783030016739

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/ahsri/965

Book Title


  • Academic writing and identity constructions: Performativity, space and territory in academic workplaces

Start Page


  • 75

End Page


  • 96

Place Of Publication


  • Cham, Switzerland