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Making epilepsy a national priority in African countries

Journal Article


Abstract


  • In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) General Assembly

    passed a landmark epilepsy resolution known asWHA68.20: Global burden

    of epilepsy and the need for coordinated action at the country level to

    address its health, social, and public knowledge implications. This resolution

    is tremendously important in that it calls on all UN member countries

    to address epilepsy seriously by developing and implementing

    national plans of action. Despite this global declaration, none of the

    countries in Africa has developed an epilepsy national plan. There has

    been no political response nor has there been any financial investments

    in programs that could reduce the epilepsy treatment and knowledge

    gap at the country level. Previous international agreements, such as

    the African Resolution on Epilepsy (2000), were never adequately implemented

    despite research in some countries such as Zimbabwe and

    Senegal, showing that the cost of managing epilepsy in resource-poor

    settings was quite minimal.

UOW Authors


  •   Little, Ann (external author)
  •   Secco, Mary (external author)
  •   Mugumbate, Jacob

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Little, A., Secco, M. & Mugumbate, J. (2018). Making epilepsy a national priority in African countries. Epilepsy & Behavior, 89 173-174.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85056190435

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 173

End Page


  • 174

Volume


  • 89

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) General Assembly

    passed a landmark epilepsy resolution known asWHA68.20: Global burden

    of epilepsy and the need for coordinated action at the country level to

    address its health, social, and public knowledge implications. This resolution

    is tremendously important in that it calls on all UN member countries

    to address epilepsy seriously by developing and implementing

    national plans of action. Despite this global declaration, none of the

    countries in Africa has developed an epilepsy national plan. There has

    been no political response nor has there been any financial investments

    in programs that could reduce the epilepsy treatment and knowledge

    gap at the country level. Previous international agreements, such as

    the African Resolution on Epilepsy (2000), were never adequately implemented

    despite research in some countries such as Zimbabwe and

    Senegal, showing that the cost of managing epilepsy in resource-poor

    settings was quite minimal.

UOW Authors


  •   Little, Ann (external author)
  •   Secco, Mary (external author)
  •   Mugumbate, Jacob

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Little, A., Secco, M. & Mugumbate, J. (2018). Making epilepsy a national priority in African countries. Epilepsy & Behavior, 89 173-174.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85056190435

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 173

End Page


  • 174

Volume


  • 89

Place Of Publication


  • United States