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Comparison of design loads for cold-formed steel and reinforced concrete mid-rise structures

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Cold-formed steel (CFS) has been demonstrated to be a practical loadbearing construction material for mid-rise apartment buildings internationally. However, the use of CFS for mid-rise residential buildings in Australia has been extremely limited. Reinforced concrete (RC) is conventionally used for mid-rise construction in Australia. Theoretically, CFS has a number of benefits over RC. However, within the literature, there is a lack of evidence of these advantages. One potential benefit is the higher strength-to-weight ratio of CFS. While this material property relates to weight reduction, other factors such as load factors and live loads also affect the design loads. This study aims to quantitatively demonstrate this advantage in application through design to the Australian standards. A typical RC structure mid-rise residential building was designed for this comparative study. The building is seven storeys above ground level with a single basement car park level, and is notionally located in Sydney. The building was designed for two structural systems (CFS and RC) to ensure structural stability and an efficient design. The design loads of the conventional RC system are compared with that of a CFS system with reference to the Australian standards. The CFS building demonstrates a reduction in weight of 60% when compared to the weight of the RC building of the same dimensions. The reduction in serviceability load is 54% and ultimate design load is 53%. The seismic loads for the CFS building are up to 58% less, whilst wind loads are the same for both structures. This study demonstrates the weight reduction and its implications resulting from changing a building design from RC to CFS. Future work should consider an analysis of the potential economies in foundation design through the use of a CFS superstructure. This research strengthens the case for implementation of CFS construction in the Australian mid-rise sector.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Franklin, N., Heffernan, E. Elizabeth. & McCarthy, T. J. (2018). Comparison of design loads for cold-formed steel and reinforced concrete mid-rise structures. Proceedings of The International Conference on Engineering Research and Practice for Steel Construction (p. 49).

Start Page


  • 49

Abstract


  • Cold-formed steel (CFS) has been demonstrated to be a practical loadbearing construction material for mid-rise apartment buildings internationally. However, the use of CFS for mid-rise residential buildings in Australia has been extremely limited. Reinforced concrete (RC) is conventionally used for mid-rise construction in Australia. Theoretically, CFS has a number of benefits over RC. However, within the literature, there is a lack of evidence of these advantages. One potential benefit is the higher strength-to-weight ratio of CFS. While this material property relates to weight reduction, other factors such as load factors and live loads also affect the design loads. This study aims to quantitatively demonstrate this advantage in application through design to the Australian standards. A typical RC structure mid-rise residential building was designed for this comparative study. The building is seven storeys above ground level with a single basement car park level, and is notionally located in Sydney. The building was designed for two structural systems (CFS and RC) to ensure structural stability and an efficient design. The design loads of the conventional RC system are compared with that of a CFS system with reference to the Australian standards. The CFS building demonstrates a reduction in weight of 60% when compared to the weight of the RC building of the same dimensions. The reduction in serviceability load is 54% and ultimate design load is 53%. The seismic loads for the CFS building are up to 58% less, whilst wind loads are the same for both structures. This study demonstrates the weight reduction and its implications resulting from changing a building design from RC to CFS. Future work should consider an analysis of the potential economies in foundation design through the use of a CFS superstructure. This research strengthens the case for implementation of CFS construction in the Australian mid-rise sector.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Franklin, N., Heffernan, E. Elizabeth. & McCarthy, T. J. (2018). Comparison of design loads for cold-formed steel and reinforced concrete mid-rise structures. Proceedings of The International Conference on Engineering Research and Practice for Steel Construction (p. 49).

Start Page


  • 49