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Polymerisation Shrinkage Profiling of Dental Composites using Optical Fibre Sensing and their Correlation with Degree of Conversion and Curing Rate

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Traditional polymerisation shrinkage (PS) measurement systems measure average PS of dental composites, but the true local PS varies along the length and breadth of the composite. The PS depends on the curing light intensity distribution, resultant degree of conversion (DOC) and the curing rate. In this paper, optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensing based technology is used to measure the linear post-gel PS at multiple locations within dental composite specimens, and is correlated with DOC and curing rate. A commercial dental composite is used, and its post-gel PS and DOC are mapped using embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors at different curing conditions. The distance between the curing lamp and the composite specimen is varied which resulted in different intensity distribution across the specimen. The effect of curing light intensity distribution on PS, curing rate and DOC are investigated for demonstrating a relationship among them. It is demonstrated that FBG sensing method is an effective method to accurately profiling post-gel PS across the specimen.

Authors


  •   Rajan, Ginu
  •   Raju, Raju (external author)
  •   Jinachandran, Sagar (external author)
  •   Farrar, Paul (external author)
  •   Xi, Jiangtao
  •   Prusty, Gangadhara B. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • G. Rajan, R. Raju, S. Jinachandran, P. Farrar, J. Xi & B. Prusty, "Polymerisation Shrinkage Profiling of Dental Composites using Optical Fibre Sensing and their Correlation with Degree of Conversion and Curing Rate," Scientific Reports, vol. 9, (1) pp. 3162-3162, 2019.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85062261327

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3450&context=eispapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/2443

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 3162

End Page


  • 3162

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Traditional polymerisation shrinkage (PS) measurement systems measure average PS of dental composites, but the true local PS varies along the length and breadth of the composite. The PS depends on the curing light intensity distribution, resultant degree of conversion (DOC) and the curing rate. In this paper, optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensing based technology is used to measure the linear post-gel PS at multiple locations within dental composite specimens, and is correlated with DOC and curing rate. A commercial dental composite is used, and its post-gel PS and DOC are mapped using embedded fibre Bragg grating sensors at different curing conditions. The distance between the curing lamp and the composite specimen is varied which resulted in different intensity distribution across the specimen. The effect of curing light intensity distribution on PS, curing rate and DOC are investigated for demonstrating a relationship among them. It is demonstrated that FBG sensing method is an effective method to accurately profiling post-gel PS across the specimen.

Authors


  •   Rajan, Ginu
  •   Raju, Raju (external author)
  •   Jinachandran, Sagar (external author)
  •   Farrar, Paul (external author)
  •   Xi, Jiangtao
  •   Prusty, Gangadhara B. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2019

Citation


  • G. Rajan, R. Raju, S. Jinachandran, P. Farrar, J. Xi & B. Prusty, "Polymerisation Shrinkage Profiling of Dental Composites using Optical Fibre Sensing and their Correlation with Degree of Conversion and Curing Rate," Scientific Reports, vol. 9, (1) pp. 3162-3162, 2019.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85062261327

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3450&context=eispapers1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers1/2443

Number Of Pages


  • 0

Start Page


  • 3162

End Page


  • 3162

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom