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Teaching programming in common first year engineering: discipline insights applying a flipped learning problem-solving approach

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This paper investigated at the discipline level if flipped learning and engineering focused problem solving could be used to overcome the difficulties associated with programming in a common first year engineering curriculum. Perceived relevance of course material can impact self-efficacy and mindset resulting in lower motivation to learn, effecting achievement. Literature suggests that flipped learning and engineering problem solving can be combined to improve engagement, perceived relevance and achievement. An effective implementation of flipped learning and engineering problem solving would be reflected in student interest and achievement across all disciplines. A common first year engineering course across nine engineering disciplines and a flexible cohort was implemented and analysed across two years with 793 students. Success was measured across four objectives: 1) Appeal across disciplines; 2) Achievement; 3) Future learning impact; and 4) Enrolment in computer engineering. Overall success was found across the four objectives with no major negative impact across the first-year experience, acceptable failure rates with achievement and student experience correlated with perceived discipline relevance, and enrolment success in computer engineering. Further refinement is needed targeted at improving the civil and mining student experience.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • S. Nikolic, M. Ros & D. B. Hastie, "Teaching programming in common first year engineering: discipline insights applying a flipped learning problem-solving approach," Australasian Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 23, (1) pp. 3-14, 2018.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057005784

Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 14

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • This paper investigated at the discipline level if flipped learning and engineering focused problem solving could be used to overcome the difficulties associated with programming in a common first year engineering curriculum. Perceived relevance of course material can impact self-efficacy and mindset resulting in lower motivation to learn, effecting achievement. Literature suggests that flipped learning and engineering problem solving can be combined to improve engagement, perceived relevance and achievement. An effective implementation of flipped learning and engineering problem solving would be reflected in student interest and achievement across all disciplines. A common first year engineering course across nine engineering disciplines and a flexible cohort was implemented and analysed across two years with 793 students. Success was measured across four objectives: 1) Appeal across disciplines; 2) Achievement; 3) Future learning impact; and 4) Enrolment in computer engineering. Overall success was found across the four objectives with no major negative impact across the first-year experience, acceptable failure rates with achievement and student experience correlated with perceived discipline relevance, and enrolment success in computer engineering. Further refinement is needed targeted at improving the civil and mining student experience.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • S. Nikolic, M. Ros & D. B. Hastie, "Teaching programming in common first year engineering: discipline insights applying a flipped learning problem-solving approach," Australasian Journal of Engineering Education, vol. 23, (1) pp. 3-14, 2018.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057005784

Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 14

Volume


  • 23

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • Australia