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Making change in the LIC: developing medical students as community-based clinician researchers

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • The concept of a clinician-scientist conjures up an image of a doctor seeing patients in the morning, then spending the afternoon in the laboratory, or something similar. Yet, the idea of translational research does not have to remain behind the laboratory door. Generalist practitioners in any setting can be researchers. Seeking to identify and understand issues of relevance in a community setting is a critical form of research. Moreover a research-aware practitioner can promote early translation of research findings into clinical practice or can engage with other researchers to investigate an issue revealed through observation. A doctor can practice science-based medicine without having to actively work as a scientist in a science laboratory, and real-world issues can inspire relevant research.

    It is well recognised that early exposure to research is one way to develop a culture of research-aware and research-active clinicians. At the University of Wollongong all students on a 12-month LIC placement are supported by academic staff to undertake a community relevant research project. Analysis of the projects undertaken to date (n=519) showed that all student projects incorporated one or more research methods, such as sampling, epidemiology, statistical analysis, research ethics, and other methods of enquiry such as qualitative research and health care evaluation. Appreciating the importance of ethical conduct of research can also help develop good practice.

    Researching in the community setting represents a practical way to engage medical students can help to develop their potential to become ‘clinician researchers’, investigating and making change relevant to their communities.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Weston, K., Rich, W., Burns, P., Mullan, J., Akhund, S. & McLennan, P. (2018). Making change in the LIC: developing medical students as community-based clinician researchers. Global Community Engaged Medical Education Muster Conference (pp. 191-1-191-1).

Start Page


  • 191-1

End Page


  • 191-1

Abstract


  • The concept of a clinician-scientist conjures up an image of a doctor seeing patients in the morning, then spending the afternoon in the laboratory, or something similar. Yet, the idea of translational research does not have to remain behind the laboratory door. Generalist practitioners in any setting can be researchers. Seeking to identify and understand issues of relevance in a community setting is a critical form of research. Moreover a research-aware practitioner can promote early translation of research findings into clinical practice or can engage with other researchers to investigate an issue revealed through observation. A doctor can practice science-based medicine without having to actively work as a scientist in a science laboratory, and real-world issues can inspire relevant research.

    It is well recognised that early exposure to research is one way to develop a culture of research-aware and research-active clinicians. At the University of Wollongong all students on a 12-month LIC placement are supported by academic staff to undertake a community relevant research project. Analysis of the projects undertaken to date (n=519) showed that all student projects incorporated one or more research methods, such as sampling, epidemiology, statistical analysis, research ethics, and other methods of enquiry such as qualitative research and health care evaluation. Appreciating the importance of ethical conduct of research can also help develop good practice.

    Researching in the community setting represents a practical way to engage medical students can help to develop their potential to become ‘clinician researchers’, investigating and making change relevant to their communities.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Weston, K., Rich, W., Burns, P., Mullan, J., Akhund, S. & McLennan, P. (2018). Making change in the LIC: developing medical students as community-based clinician researchers. Global Community Engaged Medical Education Muster Conference (pp. 191-1-191-1).

Start Page


  • 191-1

End Page


  • 191-1