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Men’s perspectives on the impact of female-directed cash transfers on gender relations: Findings from the HPTN 068 qualitative study

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • HIV is an inherently gendered disease in eastern and southern Africa, not only because

    more women than men are infected, but also because socially constructed gender

    norms work to increase women’s HIV-infection risk. The provision of cash transfers to

    young women alone in such a context adds another dimension to already existing complex

    social relations where patriarchal values are entrenched, gender inequality is the

    norm, and violence against women and girls is pervasive. It raises concerns about complicating

    young women’s relationships with their male partners or possibly even setting

    them up for more violence. In our attempt to understand how cash transfers influence

    social relations in the context of a trial among young women in South Africa, we used

    qualitative data collected during the trial to explore men’s perceptions of the impact

    of cash transfers on male-female relationships, both intimate and platonic, peer

    relationships.

UOW Authors


  •   Khoza, Makhosazane Nomhle. (external author)
  •   Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead (external author)
  •   Scorgie, Fiona (external author)
  •   Hove, Jennifer (external author)
  •   Selin, Amanda (external author)
  •   Imrie, John (external author)
  •   Twine, Rhian (external author)
  •   Kahn, Kathleen (external author)
  •   Pettifor, Audrey (external author)
  •   Mac Phail, Catherine

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Khoza, M. Nomhle., Delany-Moretlwe, S., Scorgie, F., Hove, J., Selin, A., Imrie, J., Twine, R., Kahn, K., Pettifor, A. & MacPhail, C. (2018). Men’s perspectives on the impact of female-directed cash transfers on gender relations: Findings from the HPTN 068 qualitative study. PLoS One, 13 (11), e0207654-1-e0207654-14.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057161023

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5187&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/4163

Start Page


  • e0207654-1

End Page


  • e0207654-14

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 11

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • HIV is an inherently gendered disease in eastern and southern Africa, not only because

    more women than men are infected, but also because socially constructed gender

    norms work to increase women’s HIV-infection risk. The provision of cash transfers to

    young women alone in such a context adds another dimension to already existing complex

    social relations where patriarchal values are entrenched, gender inequality is the

    norm, and violence against women and girls is pervasive. It raises concerns about complicating

    young women’s relationships with their male partners or possibly even setting

    them up for more violence. In our attempt to understand how cash transfers influence

    social relations in the context of a trial among young women in South Africa, we used

    qualitative data collected during the trial to explore men’s perceptions of the impact

    of cash transfers on male-female relationships, both intimate and platonic, peer

    relationships.

UOW Authors


  •   Khoza, Makhosazane Nomhle. (external author)
  •   Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead (external author)
  •   Scorgie, Fiona (external author)
  •   Hove, Jennifer (external author)
  •   Selin, Amanda (external author)
  •   Imrie, John (external author)
  •   Twine, Rhian (external author)
  •   Kahn, Kathleen (external author)
  •   Pettifor, Audrey (external author)
  •   Mac Phail, Catherine

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Khoza, M. Nomhle., Delany-Moretlwe, S., Scorgie, F., Hove, J., Selin, A., Imrie, J., Twine, R., Kahn, K., Pettifor, A. & MacPhail, C. (2018). Men’s perspectives on the impact of female-directed cash transfers on gender relations: Findings from the HPTN 068 qualitative study. PLoS One, 13 (11), e0207654-1-e0207654-14.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85057161023

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5187&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/4163

Start Page


  • e0207654-1

End Page


  • e0207654-14

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 11

Place Of Publication


  • United States