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Miniature baited remote underwater video (mini-BRUV) reveals the response of cryptic fishes to seagrass cover

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Seagrass habitats worldwide are degrading and becoming fragmented, threatening the important ecosystem services they provide. Fauna associated with seagrasses, particularly cryptic species, are expected to respond to these changes, but are difficult to detect at ecologically meaningful scales using non-extractive techniques. We used a small, wide-angle camera (GoPro) and a small quantity of bait positioned within the canopy of Posidonia australis meadows in Jervis Bay, New South Wales to assess the response of fishes to seagrass cover. We saw a clear positive relationship with the condition of P. australis; a high cover of this seagrass had positive effects on the diversity and abundance of cryptic fauna. Our findings highlight ecosystem shifts associated with the loss and fragmentation of biogenic habitat. These changes are of particular relevance for P. australis meadows given their current status as an endangered ecological community in several locations in NSW and their slow rate of recovery from disturbance.

UOW Authors


  •   Kiggins, R (external author)
  •   Knott, Nathan A. (external author)
  •   Davis, Andrew

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Kiggins, R. S., Knott, N. A. & Davis, A. R. (2018). Miniature baited remote underwater video (mini-BRUV) reveals the response of cryptic fishes to seagrass cover. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 101 (12), 1717-1722.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85055923084

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/context/smhpapers1/article/1384/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/377

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 1717

End Page


  • 1722

Volume


  • 101

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • Seagrass habitats worldwide are degrading and becoming fragmented, threatening the important ecosystem services they provide. Fauna associated with seagrasses, particularly cryptic species, are expected to respond to these changes, but are difficult to detect at ecologically meaningful scales using non-extractive techniques. We used a small, wide-angle camera (GoPro) and a small quantity of bait positioned within the canopy of Posidonia australis meadows in Jervis Bay, New South Wales to assess the response of fishes to seagrass cover. We saw a clear positive relationship with the condition of P. australis; a high cover of this seagrass had positive effects on the diversity and abundance of cryptic fauna. Our findings highlight ecosystem shifts associated with the loss and fragmentation of biogenic habitat. These changes are of particular relevance for P. australis meadows given their current status as an endangered ecological community in several locations in NSW and their slow rate of recovery from disturbance.

UOW Authors


  •   Kiggins, R (external author)
  •   Knott, Nathan A. (external author)
  •   Davis, Andrew

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Kiggins, R. S., Knott, N. A. & Davis, A. R. (2018). Miniature baited remote underwater video (mini-BRUV) reveals the response of cryptic fishes to seagrass cover. Environmental Biology of Fishes, 101 (12), 1717-1722.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85055923084

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/context/smhpapers1/article/1384/type/native/viewcontent

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers1/377

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 1717

End Page


  • 1722

Volume


  • 101

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands