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Developing the Dementia and driving Decision Aid (DDDA) in Taiwan

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Background: Older drivers are at greatest risk for injury or death as a result of a car accident. Driving is a major form of transport for Americans 65 years and older, with 86% actively driving (Rosenbloom & Santos, 2014). For persons with dementia, the skills required to drive safely including attention, judgement and visuospatial ability will decline and driving retirement becomes inevitable (Wheatley, Carr, & Marottoli, 2014). It is recommended persons with moderate to severe dementia should not be driving (Wheatley et al., 2014). Practitioners and caregivers play a key role in supporting dementia older people to promote driving retirement decisions. However the resource is limited to promote a common decision-making approach, by initiating dialogue to guide decision-making that promotes driving retirement, collaboration, and then placing the person central on decision-making (Andrew et al., 2015). An Taiwanese specific dementia and driving decision aid (DDDA), which was translated and modified from Australian version DDDA, addresses the gap in available supportive resources for persons with dementia that encourages early planning for driving retirement in Taiwan.

    Aims: Develop the Dementia and Driving Decision Aid (DDDA) Taiwanese version and evaluate dementia and driving education in Taiwan.

    Methods: The research was undertaken in Taipei, Taiwan. The mixed method study adopted a focus group and using survey to develop the DDDA Taiwanese version from the Mandarin translated DDDA Australian version. Participants were: (i) senior practitioners, researchers, NGOs, policy makers and (ii) consumers, family caregivers and practitioners working in clinical settings. Practitioners from across the multi-disciplinary team participated in the dementia and

    driving education (English-speaking academic presented material from an online module with simultaneous Mandarin translation by a bilingual academic) and a survey was used for the evaluation.

    Results: A total of 97 participants provided comments on the DDDA Australian version to develop the DDDA Taiwanese version (focus group and survey). Positive comments were in three areas: demand and applicability; format and targeted consumer approach. Amendments requested were including motorbikes and listing Taiwanese resources and referral processes. The DDDA Taiwanese version will be a, substantially, unchanged Australian version. A total of 82 practitioners (response rate 91%) completed the survey evaluating the dementia and driving education. There were statistically significant improvements across all criteria (p<0.01) six weeks post-education: dementia knowledge and a sense of competence and confidence in addressing dementia and driving issues.

    Conclusions: We are implementing the Taiwanese version of the DDDA through NGOs and developing a Mandarin version of the DDDA and education resource for senior practitioners to deliver across Taiwan. The resources are available through Aged and Dementia Health Education and Research (ADHERe) (www.adhere.org.au).

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Chang, H., Traynor, V., Chien, H., Yang, Y. & Tang, L. (2018). Developing the Dementia and driving Decision Aid (DDDA) in Taiwan. The 1st Payung Negeri International Health Conference (1st PANIHC)

Abstract


  • Background: Older drivers are at greatest risk for injury or death as a result of a car accident. Driving is a major form of transport for Americans 65 years and older, with 86% actively driving (Rosenbloom & Santos, 2014). For persons with dementia, the skills required to drive safely including attention, judgement and visuospatial ability will decline and driving retirement becomes inevitable (Wheatley, Carr, & Marottoli, 2014). It is recommended persons with moderate to severe dementia should not be driving (Wheatley et al., 2014). Practitioners and caregivers play a key role in supporting dementia older people to promote driving retirement decisions. However the resource is limited to promote a common decision-making approach, by initiating dialogue to guide decision-making that promotes driving retirement, collaboration, and then placing the person central on decision-making (Andrew et al., 2015). An Taiwanese specific dementia and driving decision aid (DDDA), which was translated and modified from Australian version DDDA, addresses the gap in available supportive resources for persons with dementia that encourages early planning for driving retirement in Taiwan.

    Aims: Develop the Dementia and Driving Decision Aid (DDDA) Taiwanese version and evaluate dementia and driving education in Taiwan.

    Methods: The research was undertaken in Taipei, Taiwan. The mixed method study adopted a focus group and using survey to develop the DDDA Taiwanese version from the Mandarin translated DDDA Australian version. Participants were: (i) senior practitioners, researchers, NGOs, policy makers and (ii) consumers, family caregivers and practitioners working in clinical settings. Practitioners from across the multi-disciplinary team participated in the dementia and

    driving education (English-speaking academic presented material from an online module with simultaneous Mandarin translation by a bilingual academic) and a survey was used for the evaluation.

    Results: A total of 97 participants provided comments on the DDDA Australian version to develop the DDDA Taiwanese version (focus group and survey). Positive comments were in three areas: demand and applicability; format and targeted consumer approach. Amendments requested were including motorbikes and listing Taiwanese resources and referral processes. The DDDA Taiwanese version will be a, substantially, unchanged Australian version. A total of 82 practitioners (response rate 91%) completed the survey evaluating the dementia and driving education. There were statistically significant improvements across all criteria (p<0.01) six weeks post-education: dementia knowledge and a sense of competence and confidence in addressing dementia and driving issues.

    Conclusions: We are implementing the Taiwanese version of the DDDA through NGOs and developing a Mandarin version of the DDDA and education resource for senior practitioners to deliver across Taiwan. The resources are available through Aged and Dementia Health Education and Research (ADHERe) (www.adhere.org.au).

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Chang, H., Traynor, V., Chien, H., Yang, Y. & Tang, L. (2018). Developing the Dementia and driving Decision Aid (DDDA) in Taiwan. The 1st Payung Negeri International Health Conference (1st PANIHC)