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Like and share: Associations between social media engagement and dietary choices in children

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Objective

    To examine whether social media and online behaviours are associated with unhealthy food and beverage consumption in children.

    Design

    A cross-sectional online survey was used to assess Internet and social media use, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Linear regression models were used to examine associations between online behaviours, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages, adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic status.

    Setting

    New South Wales, Australia, in 2014.

    Subjects

    Children aged 10–16 years (n 417).

    Results

    Watching food brand video content on YouTube, purchasing food online and seeing favourite food brands advertised online were significantly associated with higher frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and drinks after adjustment for age, sex and socio-economic status.

    Conclusions

    Children who have higher online engagement with food brands and content, particularly through online video, are more likely to consume unhealthy foods and drinks. Our findings highlight the need to include social media in regulations and policies designed to limit children’s exposure to unhealthy food marketing. Social media companies have a greater role to play in protecting children from advertising.

Authors


  •   Baldwin, Heather (external author)
  •   Freeman, Becky (external author)
  •   Kelly, Bridget

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Baldwin, H. J., Freeman, B. & Kellyt, B. (2018). Like and share: Associations between social media engagement and dietary choices in children. Public Health Nutrition, 21 (17), 3210-3215.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85052698790

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5219&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/4194

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 3210

End Page


  • 3215

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 17

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Objective

    To examine whether social media and online behaviours are associated with unhealthy food and beverage consumption in children.

    Design

    A cross-sectional online survey was used to assess Internet and social media use, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Linear regression models were used to examine associations between online behaviours, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages, adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic status.

    Setting

    New South Wales, Australia, in 2014.

    Subjects

    Children aged 10–16 years (n 417).

    Results

    Watching food brand video content on YouTube, purchasing food online and seeing favourite food brands advertised online were significantly associated with higher frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and drinks after adjustment for age, sex and socio-economic status.

    Conclusions

    Children who have higher online engagement with food brands and content, particularly through online video, are more likely to consume unhealthy foods and drinks. Our findings highlight the need to include social media in regulations and policies designed to limit children’s exposure to unhealthy food marketing. Social media companies have a greater role to play in protecting children from advertising.

Authors


  •   Baldwin, Heather (external author)
  •   Freeman, Becky (external author)
  •   Kelly, Bridget

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Baldwin, H. J., Freeman, B. & Kellyt, B. (2018). Like and share: Associations between social media engagement and dietary choices in children. Public Health Nutrition, 21 (17), 3210-3215.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85052698790

Ro Full-text Url


  • https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5219&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/4194

Number Of Pages


  • 5

Start Page


  • 3210

End Page


  • 3215

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 17

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom