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Translating Delirium Knowledge into Practice: A focus of Medical Students

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Background & Aim: Delirium is a common occurrence in hospitalised adults resulting in significant morbidity. Despite clinical guidelines and evidence on best practice, delirium continues to be under recognised and poorly managed. The aim is to evaluate the implementation of an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education programme, specifically perceptions of confidence and competence about delirium care and experiences of using scenarios.

    Methods: The intervention was an innovative education programme consisting of a face-to-face sessions and an Object Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A pre-post quasi-experimental design was adopted: surveys at baseline and immediately post. Surveys consisted of a 16-item delirium knowledge MCQ as well as questions about self-perceived confidence and competence in delirium assessment and management. A convenience sample of undergraduate medical students at St George Hospital were recruited. The intervention was delivered by a Senior RN (Transitional Nurse Practitioner).

    Results: A total of 12, 3rd year medical students participated. There was a high level of delirium knowledge at baseline with a mean MCQ score of 13.67 (85.4%). While the mean score to 14.54 (90.8%) post intervention, but no statistically significant difference was found (p=0.077). There was a significant increase in self-perceived confidence (p=0.001) and competence (p=0.001) in using the gold standard delirium assessment tool. There was also a significant increase in self-perceived confidence (p=0.002) and competence (p=0.002) in delirium knowledge. In addition, 100% of participants report high satisfaction with the education program. Qualitative results will also be available in October.

    Conclusion: The innovative delirium care clinical simulation education appears to be effective in increasing the self- perceived confidence and competence of delirium assessment and management for medical students. The study continues to be conducted amongst the 3rd year undergraduate medical students.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Smerdely, P., Traynor, V. & Chang, H. (2018). Translating Delirium Knowledge into Practice: A focus of Medical Students. Medical Research Symposium 2018 (pp. 1-1).

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Abstract


  • Background & Aim: Delirium is a common occurrence in hospitalised adults resulting in significant morbidity. Despite clinical guidelines and evidence on best practice, delirium continues to be under recognised and poorly managed. The aim is to evaluate the implementation of an innovative delirium care clinical simulation education programme, specifically perceptions of confidence and competence about delirium care and experiences of using scenarios.

    Methods: The intervention was an innovative education programme consisting of a face-to-face sessions and an Object Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A pre-post quasi-experimental design was adopted: surveys at baseline and immediately post. Surveys consisted of a 16-item delirium knowledge MCQ as well as questions about self-perceived confidence and competence in delirium assessment and management. A convenience sample of undergraduate medical students at St George Hospital were recruited. The intervention was delivered by a Senior RN (Transitional Nurse Practitioner).

    Results: A total of 12, 3rd year medical students participated. There was a high level of delirium knowledge at baseline with a mean MCQ score of 13.67 (85.4%). While the mean score to 14.54 (90.8%) post intervention, but no statistically significant difference was found (p=0.077). There was a significant increase in self-perceived confidence (p=0.001) and competence (p=0.001) in using the gold standard delirium assessment tool. There was also a significant increase in self-perceived confidence (p=0.002) and competence (p=0.002) in delirium knowledge. In addition, 100% of participants report high satisfaction with the education program. Qualitative results will also be available in October.

    Conclusion: The innovative delirium care clinical simulation education appears to be effective in increasing the self- perceived confidence and competence of delirium assessment and management for medical students. The study continues to be conducted amongst the 3rd year undergraduate medical students.

Publication Date


  • 2018

Citation


  • Montgomery, A., Smerdely, P., Traynor, V. & Chang, H. (2018). Translating Delirium Knowledge into Practice: A focus of Medical Students. Medical Research Symposium 2018 (pp. 1-1).

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